Document Detail


Genotoxic effects of aluminum, iron and manganese in human cells and experimental systems: A review of the literature.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21247993     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
There is considerable evidence indicating an increase in neurodegenerative disorders in industrialized countries. The clinical symptoms and the possible mutagenic effects produced by acute poisoning and by chronic exposure to metals are of major interest. This study is a review of the data found concerning the genotoxic potential of three metals: aluminum (Al), iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn), with emphasis on their action on human cells.
Authors:
Pdl Lima; Mc Vaconcellos; Rc Montenegro; Mo Bahia; Lmg Antunes; Et Costa; Rr Burbano
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Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2011-1-19
Journal Detail:
Title:  Human & experimental toxicology     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1477-0903     ISO Abbreviation:  -     Publication Date:  2011 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-1-20     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9004560     Medline TA:  Hum Exp Toxicol     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Molecular Biology Laboratory, Center of Biological and Health Sciences, Estadual University of Pará, Belém/PA, Brazil.
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