Document Detail


Genistein administered as a once-daily oral supplement had no beneficial effect on the tibia in rat models for postmenopausal bone loss.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23385720     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: Estrogen deficiency after menopause results in rapid bone loss, predisposing women to osteoporotic fractures. Genistein, a phytoestrogen present in high concentrations in soy, is an ingredient in dietary supplements aggressively marketed for bone health. However, in a recent long-duration clinical trial in postmenopausal women, the efficacy of soy extracts in reducing bone loss was disappointing. To better understand the failure of soy extracts to consistently induce a robust skeletal response in women, we investigated the long-term (5 mo) efficacy of genistein, administered as a daily oral supplement, (1) in preventing cancellous bone loss in skeletally mature virgin Long-Evans rats ovariectomized at 7 months of age and (2) in improving cancellous bone mass and architecture in aged retired-breeder rats ovariectomized at 16 or 22 months of age.
METHODS: Rats within each age group were randomly assigned into one of three treatment groups (n = 7-12 rats/group): (1) vehicle control, (2) genistein 485 μg/day, or (3) genistein 970 μg/day, resulting in mean (SE) serum genistein levels of 0.18 (0.10), 0.76 (0.15), and 1.48 (0.31) μM, respectively. Total tibia bone mass and density were evaluated using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, whereas cancellous bone mass and architecture in the tibial metaphysis, as well as cortical bone mass and architecture in the tibial diaphysis, were evaluated by micro-CT.
RESULTS: Oral genistein administered as a dietary supplement did not influence the cumulative effects of ovariectomy, aging, and/or reproductive history on cancellous and cortical bone mass and architecture.
CONCLUSIONS: Serum levels of genistein similar to those in women consuming a high-soy diet are ineffective in preventing or treating bone loss in rat models for postmenopausal osteoporosis.
Authors:
Russell T Turner; Urszula T Iwaniec; Juan E Andrade; Adam J Branscum; Steven L Neese; Dawn A Olson; Lindsay Wagner; Victor C Wang; Susan L Schantz; William G Helferich
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Menopause (New York, N.Y.)     Volume:  20     ISSN:  1530-0374     ISO Abbreviation:  Menopause     Publication Date:  2013 Jun 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-05-29     Completed Date:  2014-01-13     Revised Date:  2014-06-04    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9433353     Medline TA:  Menopause     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  677-86     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Aging
Animals
Bone Density / drug effects
Dietary Supplements
Disease Models, Animal
Female
Genistein / administration & dosage*,  blood
Humans
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal / prevention & control*
Ovariectomy
Phytoestrogens
Rats
Rats, Long-Evans
Reproduction
Tibia / drug effects,  pathology
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
AT006268/AT/NCCAM NIH HHS; P01 AG024387/AG/NIA NIH HHS; P50 AT006268/AT/NCCAM NIH HHS; T32 ES007326/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Phytoestrogens; DH2M523P0H/Genistein
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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