Document Detail


The Fusarium toxins deoxynivalenol (DON) and zearalenone (ZON) in animal feeding.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21571381     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The contamination of cereal grains with toxic secondary metabolites of fungi, mycotoxins, is a permanent challenge in animal nutrition as health and performance of the animals may be compromised as well as the quality of animal derived food. Therefore the present article reviews the issue of mycotoxins in animal nutrition. As the Fusarium toxins deoxynivalenol (DON) and zearalenone (ZON) are of particular importance under the production conditions in central Europe and Germany, with respect to their frequent occurrence in toxicologically relevant concentrations, special emphasis is layed on those mycotoxins. The effects of DON and ZON on susceptible animals as well as management strategies to cope with the contamination of grain with those toxins are reviewed.
Authors:
Susanne Döll; Sven Dänicke
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2011-5-13
Journal Detail:
Title:  Preventive veterinary medicine     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1873-1716     ISO Abbreviation:  -     Publication Date:  2011 May 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-5-16     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8217463     Medline TA:  Prev Vet Med     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Institute of Animal Nutrition, Friedrich-Loeffler-Institute, Federal Research Institute for Animal Health, Bundesallee 50, D-38116 Braunschweig, Germany.
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