Document Detail


Fructose, exercise, and health.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20622544     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Process    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The large daily energy intake common among athletes can be associated with a large daily intake of fructose, a simple sugar that has been linked to metabolic disorders. Fructose commonly is found in foods and beverages as a natural component (e.g., in fruits) or as an added ingredient (as sucrose or high fructose corn syrup [HFCS]). A growing body of research suggests that excessive intake of fructose (e.g., >50 g.d(-1)) may be linked to development of the metabolic syndrome (obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance, proinflammatory state, prothrombosis). The rapid metabolism of fructose in the liver and resultant drop in hepatic adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels have been linked with mitochondrial and endothelial dysfunction, alterations that could predispose to obesity, diabetes, and hypertension. However, for athletes, a positive aspect of fructose metabolism is that, in combination with other simple sugars, fructose stimulates rapid fluid and solute absorption in the small intestine and helps increase exogenous carbohydrate oxidation during exercise, an important response for improving exercise performance. Although additional research is required to clarify the possible health-related implications of long-term intake of large amounts of dietary fructose among athletes, regular exercise training and consequent high daily energy expenditure may protect athletes from the negative metabolic responses associated with chronically high dietary fructose intake.
Authors:
Richard J Johnson; Robert Murray
Related Documents :
3821454 - The ultraendurance triathlete: a physiological profile.
15584634 - An evaluation of standardizing target ventilation for eucapnic voluntary hyperventilati...
23436684 - A case study of an iron-deficient female olympic 1500-m runner.
3390874 - Heat problems in the tennis player.
23506794 - Time course of the attenuation of sympathetic nervous activity during active heat accli...
17636704 - Inhaled corticosteroids compared to placebo for prevention of exercise induced bronchoc...
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Review    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Current sports medicine reports     Volume:  9     ISSN:  1537-8918     ISO Abbreviation:  Curr Sports Med Rep     Publication Date:    2010 Jul-Aug
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-07-12     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101134380     Medline TA:  Curr Sports Med Rep     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  253-8     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Division of Renal Diseases and Hypertension, University of Colorado, Denver, CO, USA.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
HL-68607/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Growth hormone, exercise, and athletic performance: a continued evolution of complexity.
Next Document:  ACSM clinician profile. James Macintyre.