Document Detail


Foot care among diabetic patients in south Auckland.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  7715874     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
AIM: To describe footcare among diabetic patients in south Auckland. METHOD: Direct interview of 331 European, 86 Maori and 123 Pacific Islands patients attending local diabetes services and a stratified subsample of general practitioners. Interviews included closed and open questions of diabetes knowledge, demographic and medical history and were followed by a thorough inspection of the feet. RESULTS: Major lesions (amputation, foot ulcer) and predisposing lesions (callus or fungal infection/maceration) were present in 48.5% of patients. Major lesions were particularly common among Pacific Islands patients (9.4%) vs European (3.9%), Maori (5.5%), (p < 0.05). Fungal infection/maceration was less common among Pacific Islands patients (23.0%) vs 42.3%, 42.2% respectively, (p < 0.001). Fungal infection/maceration was more common and callus formation less common among men when compared with women. Forty percent (n = 214) of patients, including eight with either an ulcer or a blister, had not had their feet examined over the preceding 12 months. Good foot care was present in 52.7% Europeans, 31.0% Maori and 26.8% Pacific Islands patients (p < 0.001). Diabetes knowledge was poorest in those with poor foot care among Europeans and Maori. CONCLUSION: While the provision of footcare advice, adherence to such advice and monitoring of footcare remain uneven, the hospital and community costs of the diabetic foot will continue to be high.
Authors:
D Simmons; D Scott; T Kenealy; R Scragg
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The New Zealand medical journal     Volume:  108     ISSN:  0028-8446     ISO Abbreviation:  N. Z. Med. J.     Publication Date:  1995 Mar 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1995-05-16     Completed Date:  1995-05-16     Revised Date:  2010-03-24    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0401067     Medline TA:  N Z Med J     Country:  NEW ZEALAND    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  106-8     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Middlemore Hospital, Auckland.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Diabetic Foot / ethnology,  prevention & control*,  therapy*
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
New Zealand
Patient Education as Topic
Self Care*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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