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Food intake in blattella germanica (L.) nymphs affects hydrocarbon synthesis and its allocation in adults between epicuticle and reproduction
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  10421895     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The causal relationship between food intake and hydrocarbon synthesis was examined in vivo and in vitro. Fed Blattella germanica (L.) nymphs synthesized hydrocarbons in a stage-specific manner, with high rates occurring in the first 6 days of a 13-day last stadium, in relation to feeding. A similar pattern was exhibited in vitro by sternites and tergites from fed nymphs. In contrast, starved nymphs synthesized hydrocarbons at normal rates for the first 2 days, but then synthesis declined and ceased by day 6. Their abdominal sternites and tergites displayed a similar biosynthetic pattern in vitro, showing that starved tissues lost the capacity to synthesize hydrocarbons, even when provided appropriate nutrients. Synthesis resumed within 2 days of being fed on day 6, reaching a maximum rate 6 days later. Some hydrocarbon appeared on the nymphal cuticle, but almost 4-fold more hydrocarbon was internal in hemolymph lipophorin, fat body, and the developing imaginal cuticle. Because most hydrocarbon synthesized in nymphs provisions the adult, and synthesis is related to food intake, we examined trade-offs in allocations in food-limited insects. Nymphs provided with insufficient quantities of food allocated normal amounts of hydrocarbons to the nymphal epicuticle, but molted into smaller adults with significantly less internal hydrocarbons. These cockroaches directed nearly normal amounts of hydrocarbons to their epicuticle, oocytes, and oothecae, at the cost of internal hydrocarbon reserves for repair and subsequent gonotrophic cycles. Hydrocarbons, thus, appear to serve an important cross-stadial resource and the object of competition among several nymphal and adult tissues. Arch. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
Authors:
Young; Bachmann; Schal
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Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Archives of insect biochemistry and physiology     Volume:  41     ISSN:  1520-6327     ISO Abbreviation:  Arch. Insect Biochem. Physiol.     Publication Date:  1999  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1999-07-29     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8501752     Medline TA:  Arch Insect Biochem Physiol     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  Eng     Pagination:  214-24     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Department of Entomology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh.
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