Document Detail


Food deprivation inhibits estrous behavior in hormone-treated Syrian hamsters despite elevated estradiol levels.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  11971665     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Estradiol and progesterone (P) induce female mammalian reproductive behaviors, which are, in turn, sensitive to food availability. When ovariectomized, steroid-primed hamsters are food deprived for 48 h, estrous behavior is suppressed. While this suppression of estrous behavior may be due to alterations in neural steroid receptor levels, it is also possible that decreased levels of circulating estradiol could be involved in mediating this suppression. Ovariectomized Syrian hamsters given varying doses of estradiol benzoate (EB) and P were tested to determine whether increasing doses of sex steroids would overcome the suppressive effects of food deprivation on estrous behavior. As expected, lordosis duration decreased in food-deprived animals. Increasing the levels of EB, but not P, increased lordosis duration in the food-deprived animals so that animals who were given 20 microg of EB had lordosis durations significantly longer than food-deprived hamsters that received 1.5 microg and 2.5 microg EB. Following an injection of 2.5 microg of EB, food-deprived hamsters actually had higher circulating levels of estradiol than ad libitum-fed animals. Therefore, increasing circulating levels of estradiol can increase lordosis durations in fasted animals; however, the suppression of estrous behavior occurs despite increased circulating estradiol levels in ovariectomized, steroid-treated animals. The most parsimonious explanation for this phenomenon is a deprivation-induced reduction in neural responsiveness to estradiol.
Authors:
Juli E Jones; Rebecca R Pick; George N Wade
Related Documents :
7667375 - Food palatability and hunger modulated effects of cgs 9896 and cgs 8216 on food intake.
7740545 - Restraint-induced stress in pregnant mice--degree of immobilization affects maternal in...
11560125 - Time of day and access to food alter water intake in rats after water deprivation.
18805815 - Natural variation in plasticity of glucose homeostasis and food intake.
20879915 - Overview of existing european food consumption databases: critical aspects in relation ...
17605835 - Food and nutrient availability in new zealand: an analysis of supermarket sales data.
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Hormones and behavior     Volume:  41     ISSN:  0018-506X     ISO Abbreviation:  Horm Behav     Publication Date:  2002 May 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2002-04-24     Completed Date:  2002-07-03     Revised Date:  2007-11-14    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0217764     Medline TA:  Horm Behav     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  316-20     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
(c) 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).
Affiliation:
Center for Neuroendocrine Studies, University of Massachusetts, Amherst 01003-7720, USA. jones@cns.umass.edu
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Cricetinae
Estradiol / analogs & derivatives*,  blood*,  pharmacology
Estrous Cycle / physiology*
Female
Food Deprivation / physiology*
Mesocricetus
Posture
Progesterone / pharmacology
Sexual Behavior, Animal / physiology*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
MH00321-20/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; MH20051/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; NS10873-29/NS/NINDS NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
50-28-2/Estradiol; 50-50-0/estradiol 3-benzoate; 57-83-0/Progesterone

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Changes in progesterone metabolites in the hippocampus can modulate open field and forced swim test ...
Next Document:  Fraternal birth order and birth weight in probably prehomosexual feminine boys.