Document Detail


Fluid manipulation among individuals with lower urinary tract symptoms: a mixed methods study.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21073582     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
AIMS AND OBJECTIVE: To determine, qualitatively and quantitatively, how individuals use fluid manipulation to self-manage the urinary symptoms of daytime frequency, urgency and urine leakage and the underlying rationale for this behaviour.
BACKGROUND: Lower urinary tract symptoms are prevalent and burdensome, and little is known about how individuals with lower urinary tract symptoms manipulate their fluid intake.
DESIGN: A mixed methods design included statistical analysis of data from a population-based survey of urologic symptoms and qualitative analysis of in-depth interviews.
METHOD: Quantitative data came from 5503 participants of the baseline Boston Area Community Health Survey, a population-based, random sample epidemiologic survey of urologic symptoms. Qualitative data came from in-depth interviews with a random subsample from Boston Area Community Health of 152 black, white and Hispanic men and women with LUTS.
RESULTS: Qualitative data showed that some respondents restricted fluid intake while others increased it, in both cases with the expectation of improved symptoms. Quantitative data showed that fluid intake was greater in men and women reporting frequency (p < 0·001). Women with frequency drank significantly more water (p < 0·001), while women with urgency drank significantly less water (p = 0·047).
CONCLUSIONS: This study found divergent expectations of the role of fluids in alleviating symptoms, leading some individuals to restrict and others to increase fluid intake. Individuals with lower urinary tract symptoms may need guidance in fluid management.
RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nurses should be aware that patients may self-manage lower urinary tract symptoms by restricting fluid intake, putting them at risk for dehydration, constipation and urinary tract infection, but also that they may be increasing their fluid intake, which could worsen symptoms. This study pinpoints a specific area of need among patients with lower urinary tract symptoms and provides a practical opportunity for nurses to assist their patients with behavioural and fluid management by emphasising the clinical guidelines.
Authors:
Emily A Elstad; Nancy N Maserejian; John B McKinlay; Sharon L Tennstedt
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural     Date:  2010-11-15
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of clinical nursing     Volume:  20     ISSN:  1365-2702     ISO Abbreviation:  J Clin Nurs     Publication Date:  2011 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-12-16     Completed Date:  2011-04-05     Revised Date:  2013-10-30    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9207302     Medline TA:  J Clin Nurs     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  156-65     Citation Subset:  N    
Copyright Information:
© 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Affiliation:
Department of Health Behavior & Health Education, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Gillings School of Global Public Health, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. elstad@email.unc.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Aged
Female
Fluid Therapy*
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Urinary Tract Infections / therapy*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
DK073835/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; DK56842/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; R01 DK073835-03/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; R21 DK081844/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; U01 DK056842/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

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