Document Detail


First trimester maternal blood rheology and pregnancy induced hypertension.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  16368576     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
This study evaluates the relationship between the first trimester assessment of maternal rheology and the subsequent development of pregnancy induced hypertension. This is a prospective observational study based in the Glasgow Royal Maternity Hospital, Scotland. From an original population of 744 consecutive antenatal attendees a total of 579 women were booked at less than 14 weeks' gestation. The main study group is a further subset comprising 251 primigravid women booking with a singleton pregnancy without essential hypertension. Previously published data from a group of non-pregnant women of similar age drawn from the same local community was used for external comparison. Blood samples were collected at the booking visit, from which fibrinogen, red cell aggregation, haematocrit and plasma, whole blood, relative and corrected viscosities were recorded. Information was obtained from the case notes in retrospect starting approximately 1 year after the first patients had first been recruited into the trial. The overall outcome of the pregnancies was noted with particular reference to pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH), birth weight, antepartum haemorrhage, pre-term labour, perinatal death, condition at delivery and neonatal complication. Our results show PIH is associated with a significantly raised mean blood viscosity and fibrinogen at time of booking. All significance disappears after adjustment for smoking, diastolic blood pressure and age. Viscosity is, however, only marginally non-significant (p = 0.07). In conclusion, blood rheology, in particular blood viscosity and fibrinogen, may play a predictive role in the development of pregnancy-induced hypertension. When combined with measurement of smoking and diastolic blood pressure at booking, these measurements could be used to calculate a risk score for the development of PIH, allowing targeting of antenatal care. Further data is required.
Authors:
J B Robins; M Woodward; G Lowe; P McCaul; H Cheyne; J J Walker
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology : the journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology     Volume:  25     ISSN:  0144-3615     ISO Abbreviation:  J Obstet Gynaecol     Publication Date:  2005 Nov 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2005-12-21     Completed Date:  2006-03-07     Revised Date:  2006-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8309140     Medline TA:  J Obstet Gynaecol     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  746-50     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Glasgow Royal Maternity Hospital, Scotland, UK. james.robins@irh.scot.nhs.uk
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Blood Viscosity / physiology*
Erythrocyte Deformability / physiology*
Female
Hemorheology
Humans
Hypertension, Pregnancy-Induced / blood*
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome
Pregnancy Trimester, First / physiology*
Prospective Studies

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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