Document Detail


Fetal sex, social support, and postpartum depression.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  19961663     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: To examine the impact of prenatal and postnatal social support on the association between fetal sex and postpartum depression (PPD). METHOD: We conducted a prospective cohort study in Changsha, China, between February and September 2007. We first compared the sociodemographic and obstetric characteristics, and the prenatal and postnatal social support between women who gave birth to a female infant and those who gave birth to a male infant. We then examined the association between fetal sex and PPD by following logistic regression models: fetal sex as the independent variable; with adjustment for sociodemographic and obstetric factors; with adjustment for sociodemographic, obstetric factors, and prenatal social support; and with adjustment for sociodemographic, obstetric factors, and postnatal social support. RESULTS: Postnatal social support scores were much lower in women who gave birth to a female infant than in those who gave birth to a male infant. The odds ratio of PPD for women who gave birth to a female infant, as compared with those who gave birth to a male infant, was 3.67 (95% CI 2.31 to 5.84). The increased risk of PPD for women who gave birth to a female infant remained after adjustment for sociodemographic and obstetric factors and prenatal social support, but disappeared after adjustment for postnatal social support score. CONCLUSION: We conclude that increased risk of PPD in Chinese women who give birth to a female infant is caused by lack of social support after childbirth.
Authors:
Ri-hua Xie; Guoping He; Diana Koszycki; Mark Walker; Shi Wu Wen
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Canadian journal of psychiatry. Revue canadienne de psychiatrie     Volume:  54     ISSN:  1497-0015     ISO Abbreviation:  Can J Psychiatry     Publication Date:  2009 Nov 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2009-12-07     Completed Date:  2010-03-01     Revised Date:  2010-04-01    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7904187     Medline TA:  Can J Psychiatry     Country:  Canada    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  750-6     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Obstetrics, Maternal, and Neonatal Investigations (OMNI) Research Group, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Ottawa, Faculty of Medicine, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
China
Depression, Postpartum / etiology,  psychology*
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Risk Factors
Sex Factors
Social Support*
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
//Canadian Institutes of Health Research
Comments/Corrections
Erratum In:
Can J Psychiatry. 2009 Dec;54(12):856

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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