Document Detail


Fetal cardiac autonomic control during breathing and non-breathing epochs: the effect of maternal exercise.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22264436     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
We explored whether maternal exercise during pregnancy moderates the effect of fetal breathing movements on fetal cardiac autonomic control assessed by metrics of heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV). Thirty women were assigned to Exercise or Control group (n=15/group) based on the modifiable physical activity questionnaire (MPAQ). Magnetocardiograms (MCG) were recorded using a dedicated fetal biomagnetometer. Periods of fetal breathing activity and apnea were identified using the fetal diaphragmatic magnetomyogram (dMMG) as a marker. MCG R-waves were marked. Metrics of fetal HR and HRV were compared using 1 breathing and 1 apneic epoch/fetus. The main effects of group (Exercise vs. Control) and condition (Apnea vs. Breathing) and their interactions were explored. Fetal breathing resulted in significantly lower fetal HR and higher vagally-mediated HRV. Maternal exercise resulted in significantly lower fetal HR, higher total HRV and vagally-mediated HRV with no difference in frequency band ratios. Significant interactions between maternal exercise and fetal breathing were found for metrics summarizing total HRV and a parasympathetic metric. Post hoc comparison showed no group difference during fetal apnea. Fetal breathing was associated with a loss of Total HRV in the Control group and no difference in the Exercise group. Both groups show enhanced vagal function during fetal breathing; greater in the Exercise group. During in utero breathing movements, the fetus of the exercising mother has enhanced cardiac autonomic function that may give the offspring an adaptive advantage.
Authors:
Kathleen M Gustafson; Linda E May; Hung-wen Yeh; Stephanie K Million; John J B Allen
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Controlled Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2012-01-20
Journal Detail:
Title:  Early human development     Volume:  88     ISSN:  1872-6232     ISO Abbreviation:  Early Hum. Dev.     Publication Date:  2012 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-06-04     Completed Date:  2012-10-09     Revised Date:  2013-08-30    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7708381     Medline TA:  Early Hum Dev     Country:  Ireland    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  539-46     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
University of Kansas Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA. kgustafson@kumc.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Autonomic Nervous System / embryology,  physiology*
Exercise / physiology*
Exercise Test
Female
Health Behavior
Heart Rate, Fetal / physiology*
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Maternal Behavior / physiology
Pilot Projects
Pregnancy
Respiration*
Respiratory Mechanics / physiology
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
HD 002528/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; P30 HD002528/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; R01 HD047315/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; R01 HD047315/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; R21 HD059019/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; R21 HD059019/HD/NICHD NIH HHS
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