Document Detail


Fertility, menstrual characteristics, and contraceptive practices among white, black, and Southeast Asian refugee adolescents.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  2801286     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
This study compares fertility and menstrual characteristics and contraceptive practices of white, black, and Southeast Asian refugee adolescents participating in the Minneapolis Health Department's Maternal and Infant Care Program between 1980 and 1982. Mean ages were similar among all racial groups; however, half the Hmong adolescents had a live birth as compared to less than 25% of the other racial groups. More than 75% of the Hmong and other Southeast Asian adolescents were married as compared to 11% of the whites and 8% of the blacks. Menarche was significantly later (2 years) for Hmong and other Southeast Asians, and the interval between menarche and first pregnancy was significantly shorter for the Hmong. While more than half of the whites and blacks previously used contraception, 14% of the Hmong and 29% of the other Southeast Asians had used contraception. Oral contraceptives were the most frequently used method for whites, blacks, and Southeast Asians; the Hmong were equally likely to choose oral contraceptives or barrier methods. The Hmong were less likely to choose contraception postpartum than were the other groups.
This study compares fertility and menstrual characteristics and contraceptive practices of white, black, and Southeast Asian refugee adolescents participation in the Minneapolis Health Department's Maternal and Infant Care Program between 1980 and 1982. Mean ages were similar among all racial groups; however, 1/2 the Hmong adolescents had a live birth as compared to less than 25% of the other racial groups. More than 75% of the Hmong and other Southeast Asian adolescents were married as compared to 11% of the whites and 8% of the blacks. Menarche was significantly later (2 years) for Hmong and other Southeast Asians, and the interval between menarche and 1st pregnancy was significantly shorter for the Hmong. While more than 1/2 of the whites and blacks previously used contraception, 14% of the Hmong and 29% of the other Southeast Asians had used contraception. Oral contraceptives were the most frequently used method for whites, blacks, and Southeast Asians; the Hmong were equally likely to choose oral contraceptives or barrier methods. The Hmong were less likely to choose contraception postpartum than were the other groups.
Authors:
I Swenson; D Erickson; E Ehlinger; G Carlson; S Swaney
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Adolescence     Volume:  24     ISSN:  0001-8449     ISO Abbreviation:  Adolescence     Publication Date:  1989  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1989-11-09     Completed Date:  1989-11-09     Revised Date:  2006-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0123667     Medline TA:  Adolescence     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  647-54     Citation Subset:  IM; J    
Affiliation:
University of North Carolina, School of Nursing, Chapel Hill 27599.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
African Americans / psychology*
African Continental Ancestry Group
Asia, Southeastern / ethnology
Asian Americans / psychology*
Cross-Cultural Comparison*
Female
Gender Identity
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice*
Humans
Menstrual Cycle*
Minnesota
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Adolescence / psychology*
Refugees / psychology*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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