Document Detail


Feline plague in New Mexico: risk factors and transmission to humans.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  3421391     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The epidemiologic features of 60 cases of feline plague from 1977-1985 in New Mexico are reviewed. The most frequent clinical presentation was lethargy, anorexia, fever, and enlarged lymph nodes or abscesses. A history of hunting rodents was reported in 75 per cent of all cases. Five human plague cases were associated with five feline cases. Recommendations are presented for prevention of plague infection and transmission to humans, including restraining cats from roaming and hunting by neutering and keeping them indoors, treating them for fleas, and seeking medical care for febrile illnesses, especially when accompanied by enlarged lymph nodes.
Authors:
M Eidson; L A Tierney; O J Rollag; T Becker; T Brown; H F Hull
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  American journal of public health     Volume:  78     ISSN:  0090-0036     ISO Abbreviation:  Am J Public Health     Publication Date:  1988 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1988-10-20     Completed Date:  1988-10-20     Revised Date:  2009-11-18    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  1254074     Medline TA:  Am J Public Health     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1333-5     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
Office of Epidemiology, New Mexico Health and Environment Department, Santa Fe 87504-0968.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Cat Diseases / epidemiology,  transmission*
Cats
Fleas / microbiology
Humans
New Mexico
Plague / epidemiology,  transmission,  veterinary*
Risk Factors
Seasons
Comments/Corrections

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