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Fatal Bilateral ACA Territory Infarcts after Pituitary Apoplexy: A Case Report and Literature Review.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21311623     Owner:  NLM     Status:  PubMed-not-MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Apoplexy of pituitary tumors is a common occurrence. In addition to commonly known presentations, cerebral infarcts and consequent focal neurologic deficits are a rare presentation. A rare case of pituitary apoplexy with associated subarachnoid bleed and bilateral anterior cerebral artery infarcts is described. Vasospasm leading to cerebral infarcts and consequent focal neurologic deficits as a presentation of pituitary apoplexy needs to be better appreciated.
Authors:
Sandeep Mohindra; Priyamvada Kovai; Rajesh Chhabra
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Skull base : official journal of North American Skull Base Society ... [et al.]     Volume:  20     ISSN:  1532-0065     ISO Abbreviation:  Skull Base     Publication Date:  2010 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-02-11     Completed Date:  2011-07-14     Revised Date:  2013-05-29    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101090660     Medline TA:  Skull Base     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  285-8     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Department of Neurosurgery, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India.
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