Document Detail


Factors associated with weaning practices in term infants: a prospective observational study in Ireland.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20598218     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The WHO (2001) recommends exclusive breast-feeding and delaying the introduction of solid foods to an infant's diet until 6 months postpartum. However, in many countries, this recommendation is followed by few mothers, and earlier weaning onto solids is a commonly reported global practice. Therefore, this prospective, observational study aimed to assess compliance with the WHO recommendation and examine weaning practices, including the timing of weaning of infants, and to investigate the factors that predict weaning at ≤ 12 weeks. From an initial sample of 539 pregnant women recruited from the Coombe Women and Infants University Hospital, Dublin, 401 eligible mothers were followed up at 6 weeks and 6 months postpartum. Quantitative data were obtained on mothers' weaning practices using semi-structured questionnaires and a short dietary history of the infant's usual diet at 6 months. Only one mother (0.2%) complied with the WHO recommendation to exclusively breastfeed up to 6 months. Ninety-one (22.6%) infants were prematurely weaned onto solids at ≤ 12 weeks with predictive factors after adjustment, including mothers' antenatal reporting that infants should be weaned onto solids at ≤ 12 weeks, formula feeding at 12 weeks and mothers' reporting of the maternal grandmother as the principal source of advice on infant feeding. Mothers who weaned their infants at ≤ 12 weeks were more likely to engage in other sub-optimal weaning practices, including the addition of non-recommended condiments to their infants' foods. Provision of professional advice and exploring antenatal maternal misperceptions are potential areas for targeted interventions to improve compliance with the recommended weaning practices.
Authors:
Roslyn C Tarrant; Katherine M Younger; Margaret Sheridan-Pereira; Martin J White; John M Kearney
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2010-07-05
Journal Detail:
Title:  The British journal of nutrition     Volume:  104     ISSN:  1475-2662     ISO Abbreviation:  Br. J. Nutr.     Publication Date:  2010 Nov 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-11-10     Completed Date:  2010-12-16     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0372547     Medline TA:  Br J Nutr     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1544-54     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
School of Biological Sciences, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin Street, Dublin 8, Republic of Ireland.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Bottle Feeding
Breast Feeding
Diet
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Food
Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Ireland
Patient Compliance
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Weaning* / ethnology
Young Adult

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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