Document Detail


Factors affecting the dose response to oxytocin for labor stimulation.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  1566782     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
For nearly 40 years synthetic oxytocin has been used for labor stimulation by titrating dosage rate to uterine contractions. We used a computerized data base to determine variables affecting the dose response to oxytocin in 1773 pregnancies. Statistically important predictors of required oxytocin dosage included cervical dilatation, parity, and gestational age. Maternal body surface area was found to be associated with a higher oxytocin dosage in women undergoing induction of labor. However, the broad range of the statistical confidence intervals precluded prediction of a given pregnancy's oxytocin requirement.
Authors:
A J Satin; K J Leveno; M L Sherman; D D McIntire
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  American journal of obstetrics and gynecology     Volume:  166     ISSN:  0002-9378     ISO Abbreviation:  Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol.     Publication Date:  1992 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1992-05-20     Completed Date:  1992-05-20     Revised Date:  2004-11-17    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0370476     Medline TA:  Am J Obstet Gynecol     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1260-1     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas 75235-9032.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Humans
Labor, Induced*
Labor, Obstetric / drug effects
Oxytocin / therapeutic use*
Pregnancy
Regression Analysis
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
50-56-6/Oxytocin

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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