Document Detail


Eye and pregnancy.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23837242     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Process    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Hormonal, metabolic, hemodynamic, vascular and immunological changes that occur during pregnancy can affect the function of the eye. These changes are commonly transient, but in some cases they may be permanent and have consequences even after childbirth. The ocular effects of pregnancy may be physiological or pathological and can be associated with the development of new ocular pathology or may be modifications of pre-existing conditions. The most common physiological changes are alterations of corneal sensitivity and thickness, decreased tolerance to contact lenses, decreased intraocular pressure, hemeralopia and refractive errors. Possible posterior segment changes include worsening of diabetic retinopathy, central serous chorioretinopathy, increased risk of peripheral vitreochorioretinal dystrophies and retinal detachment. Thus, it should be kept in mind that the presence of any ocular symptoms in a pregnant woman requires ophthalmologic examination and further management.
Authors:
Marta Gotovac; Snjezana Kastelan; Adrian Lukenda
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Collegium antropologicum     Volume:  37 Suppl 1     ISSN:  0350-6134     ISO Abbreviation:  Coll Antropol     Publication Date:  2013 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-07-10     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8003354     Medline TA:  Coll Antropol     Country:  Croatia    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  189-93     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
General Hospital Pozega, Depatrment of Ophthalmology, Pozega, Croatia. martagotovac@net.hr
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