Document Detail


Exposure to brake dust and malignant mesothelioma: a study of 10 cases with mineral fiber analyses.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  12765873     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVES: A large number of workers in the USA are exposed to chrysotile asbestos through brake repair, yet only a few cases of malignant mesothelioma (MM) have been described in this population. Epidemiologic and industrial hygiene studies have failed to demonstrate an increased risk of MM in brake workers. We present our experience of MM in individuals whose only known asbestos exposure was to brake dust and correlate these findings with lung asbestos fiber burdens. METHODS: Consultation files of one of the authors were reviewed for cases of MM in which brake dust was the only known asbestos exposure. Lung fiber analyses were performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in all cases for which formalin-fixed or paraffin-embedded lung tissue was available. RESULTS: Ten cases of MM in brake dust-exposed individuals were males aged 51-73 yr. Nine cases arose in the pleura and one in the peritoneum. Although the median lung asbestos body count (19 AB/g) is at our upper limit of normal (range 0-20 AB/g), half of the cases had levels within our normal range. In every case with elevated asbestos fiber levels by SEM, excess commercial amphibole fibers were also detected. Elevated levels of chrysotile and non-commercial amphibole fibers were detected only in cases that also had increased commercial amphibole fibers. CONCLUSIONS: Brake dust contains exceedingly low levels of respirable chrysotile, much of which consists of short fibers subject to rapid pulmonary clearance. Elevated lung levels of commercial amphiboles in some brake workers suggest that unrecognized exposure to these fibers plays a critical role in the development of MM.
Authors:
Kelly J Butnor; Thomas A Sporn; Victor L Roggli
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The Annals of occupational hygiene     Volume:  47     ISSN:  0003-4878     ISO Abbreviation:  Ann Occup Hyg     Publication Date:  2003 Jun 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2003-05-26     Completed Date:  2003-08-27     Revised Date:  2006-04-19    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0203526     Medline TA:  Ann Occup Hyg     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  325-30     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
University of Vermont Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Burlington, VT 05405, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational / adverse effects,  analysis*
Asbestos, Amphibole / adverse effects,  analysis*
Automobiles*
Dust*
Humans
Male
Mesothelioma / etiology*
Microscopy, Electron
Middle Aged
Mineral Fibers / analysis
Occupational Exposure / adverse effects*
Peritoneal Neoplasms / etiology
Pleural Neoplasms / etiology
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Air Pollutants, Occupational; 0/Asbestos, Amphibole; 0/Dust; 0/Mineral Fibers

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