Document Detail


Exploring the within-person coupling of blood pressure and cognition in elders.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  19092042     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
In this study, we examined the relationship between within-person blood pressure and cognitive functioning. We conducted an analysis on 36 community-dwelling elderly individuals (age range = 60-87 years). Participants measured their blood pressure and completed cognitive tasks (i.e., the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Task, the Letter Series test, and the Number Comparison test) twice a day over 60 consecutive days. We observed a significant interaction between within-person change in blood pressure and average blood pressure for the Letter Series test. Individuals with high blood pressure tended to perform poorly, particularly on occasions when their blood pressure level was above their personal average. These results demonstrate that the relationship between blood pressure and cognition at the between-person level and the relationship within each individual should be further explored simultaneously.
Authors:
Alyssa A Gamaldo; Sarah R Weatherbee; Jason C Allaire
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences     Volume:  63     ISSN:  1079-5014     ISO Abbreviation:  J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci     Publication Date:  2008 Nov 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2008-12-18     Completed Date:  2009-02-19     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9508483     Medline TA:  J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  P386-9     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7650, USA. aagamald@ncsu.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Blood Pressure*
Blood Pressure Determination
Cognition*
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Michigan
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Regression Analysis

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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