Document Detail


Explores the social nature of early development and the way in which social and cognitive development interacts.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  12407967     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Authors:
Sue Buckley
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Comment; Editorial    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Down's syndrome, research and practice : the journal of the Sarah Duffen Centre / University of Portsmouth     Volume:  8     ISSN:  0968-7912     ISO Abbreviation:  Downs Syndr Res Pract     Publication Date:  2002 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2002-10-31     Completed Date:  2003-02-21     Revised Date:  2004-11-17    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9508122     Medline TA:  Downs Syndr Res Pract     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  v-vii     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Child Development*
Child, Preschool
Cognition Disorders*
Down Syndrome*
Humans
Mainstreaming (Education)
Social Perception*
Teaching / methods
Comments/Corrections
Comment On:
Downs Syndr Res Pract. 2002 Sep;8(2):53-8   [PMID:  12407969 ]
Downs Syndr Res Pract. 2002 Sep;8(2):43-52   [PMID:  12407968 ]

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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