Document Detail


Exercise and mental illness: results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC).
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22901347     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: Regular exercise is thought to be associated with low rates of mental illness, but this association has been inadequately studied. The purpose of this study was to test the hypotheses that the recommended amount of self-reported vigorous exercise would be cross-sectionally associated with reduced prevalence and incidence of various DSM-IV psychiatric disorders, as well as increased rates of remission.
METHOD: Data were collected from 2001 to 2005 as part of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), a 2-wave face-to-face survey conducted by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. For this study, the sample consisted of 23,505 nondisabled adults aged between 18 and 65 years.
RESULTS: Individuals who engaged in vigorous exercise at Wave 2 were significantly more likely than were nonexercisers to be diagnosed with a current psychiatric disorder (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.22, 95% CI, 1.12-1.34 for the nationally recommended amount vs no exercise), significantly less likely to attain remission from a psychiatric disorder between waves (AOR = 0.77, 95% CI, 0.65-0.91), and significantly more likely to relapse or be newly diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder between waves (AOR = 1.15, 95% CI, 1.02-1.30). Alcohol dependence and bipolar II disorder were the disorders most strongly associated with exercise.
CONCLUSIONS: This investigation suggests that the pursuit of vigorous exercise is associated with a vulnerability to mental illness. This surprising finding may be due to reward-related factors that influence both exercise engagement and the expression of certain psychiatric disorders. Prospective trials will be helpful in further clarifying the associations between exercise and mental illness, as the relationships between the 2 are more complex than previously believed.
Authors:
Elias Dakwar; Carlos Blanco; Keng-han Lin; Shang-min Liu; Diane Warden; Madhukar Trivedi; Edward V Nunes
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The Journal of clinical psychiatry     Volume:  73     ISSN:  1555-2101     ISO Abbreviation:  J Clin Psychiatry     Publication Date:  2012 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-08-20     Completed Date:  2012-10-23     Revised Date:  2014-07-14    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7801243     Medline TA:  J Clin Psychiatry     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  960-6     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
© Copyright 2012 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
Alcoholism / epidemiology,  prevention & control
Anxiety Disorders / epidemiology,  prevention & control
Bipolar Disorder / epidemiology,  prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder / epidemiology,  prevention & control
Exercise*
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mental Disorders / epidemiology*,  prevention & control*
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Recurrence / prevention & control
Substance-Related Disorders / epidemiology,  prevention & control
Tobacco Use Disorder / epidemiology,  prevention & control
United States
Young Adult
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
DA019606/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; DA020783/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; DA023200/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; DA023973/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; K23 DA031771/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; K23 DA031771-01/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; K24 DA022412/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; MH076051/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; MH082773/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; T32 DA007294/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; T32 DA007294-15/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; U10 DA 020024/DA/NIDA NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

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