Document Detail


Examining Ontario deaths due to all-terrain vehicles, and targets for prevention.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20481268     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: All-terrain vehicle (ATV) use is increasingly popular among people of all ages. Although ATV use is known to cause significant morbidity due to head and neck trauma, there is a lack of published data detailing ATV-related fatalities. We examined all ATV-related fatalities in Ontario from 1996 - 2005 to determine the epidemiology and risk factors as a guide for improved injury prevention strategies. METHODS: All ATV-related fatalities from 1996 - 2005 in Ontario were examined through Coroner's reports in the Office of the Chief Coroner of Ontario. Epidemiologic information and risk factors relating to the driver, environment, and vehicle were recorded. RESULTS: There were 74 ATV-related fatalities from 1996 - 2005. There was only one fatality per year in 1996 and 1997 and a peak of 16 per year in 2004 and 2005. Head and neck injuries were the commonest causes of death. Males comprised 90.5% of the cases. The highest risk was from age 15 - 29, and 21% of fatalities occurred in children under 16. Northeastern Ontario had the highest fatality rate. CONCLUSIONS: There was a major increase in the incidence of ATV-related fatalities in Ontario from 1996 - 2005 with the majority due to head trauma. Notable risk factors included alcohol use, riding at night, lack of helmet use, and excessive speed. We recommend the adoption of laws that focus on helmet requirements, a minimum driver age of 16, and certified training courses. Aggressive injury prevention efforts should be targeted toward males aged 15 - 29.
Authors:
Sarah Lord; Charles H Tator; Sandy Wells
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The Canadian journal of neurological sciences. Le journal canadien des sciences neurologiques     Volume:  37     ISSN:  0317-1671     ISO Abbreviation:  Can J Neurol Sci     Publication Date:  2010 May 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-05-20     Completed Date:  2010-06-10     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0415227     Medline TA:  Can J Neurol Sci     Country:  Canada    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  343-9     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Doctor of Medicine Program, Toronto Western Hospital and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Accident Prevention* / statistics & numerical data
Accidents / mortality*
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Off-Road Motor Vehicles / statistics & numerical data*
Ontario / epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk Factors
Young Adult
Comments/Corrections
Comment In:
Can J Neurol Sci. 2010 May;37(3):301   [PMID:  20481259 ]

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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