Document Detail


The evolution of vascular tissue engineering and current state of the art.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21996786     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Dacron® (polyethylene terephthalate) and Goretex® (expanded polytetrafluoroethylene) vascular grafts have been very successful in replacing obstructed blood vessels of large and medium diameters. However, as diameters decrease below 6 mm, these grafts are clearly outperformed by transposed autologous veins and, particularly, arteries. With approximately 8 million individuals with peripheral arterial disease, over 500,000 patients diagnosed with end-stage renal disease, and over 250,000 patients per year undergoing coronary bypass in the USA alone, there is a critical clinical need for a functional small-diameter conduit [Lloyd-Jones et al., Circulation 2010;121:e46-e215]. Over the last decade, we have witnessed a dramatic paradigm shift in cardiovascular tissue engineering that has driven the field away from biomaterial-focused approaches and towards more biology-driven strategies. In this article, we review the preclinical and clinical efforts in the quest for a tissue-engineered blood vessel that is free of permanent synthetic scaffolds but has the mechanical strength to become a successful arterial graft. Special emphasis is given to the tissue engineering by self-assembly (TESA) approach, which has been the only one to reach clinical trials for applications under arterial pressure.
Authors:
Marissa Peck; David Gebhart; Nathalie Dusserre; Todd N McAllister; Nicolas L'Heureux
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Review     Date:  2011-10-13
Journal Detail:
Title:  Cells, tissues, organs     Volume:  195     ISSN:  1422-6421     ISO Abbreviation:  Cells Tissues Organs (Print)     Publication Date:  2012  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-12-19     Completed Date:  2012-04-09     Revised Date:  2013-06-27    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  100883360     Medline TA:  Cells Tissues Organs     Country:  Switzerland    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  144-58     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.
Affiliation:
Cytograft Tissue Engineering Inc., Novato, Calif., USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Blood Vessel Prosthesis*
Humans
Materials Testing
Tissue Engineering / methods*
Tissue Scaffolds / chemistry
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
R43HL105010/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; R44HL064462/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

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