Document Detail


Evolution of high trophic diversity based on limited functional disparity in the feeding apparatus of marine angelfishes (f. Pomacanthidae).
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21909414     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The use of biting to obtain food items attached to the substratum is an ecologically widespread and important mode of feeding among aquatic vertebrates, which rarely has been studied. We did the first evolutionary analyses of morphology and motion kinematics of the feeding apparatus in Indo-Pacific members of an iconic family of biters, the marine angelfishes (f. Pomacanthidae). We found clear interspecific differences in gut morphology that clearly reflected a wide range of trophic niches. In contrast, feeding apparatus morphology appeared to be conserved. A few unusual structural innovations enabled angelfishes to protrude their jaws, close them in the protruded state, and tear food items from the substratum at a high velocity. Only one clade, the speciose pygmy angelfishes, showed functional departure from the generalized and clade-defining grab-and-tearing feeding pattern. By comparing the feeding kinematics of angelfishes with wrasses and parrotfishes (f. Labridae) we showed that grab-and-tearing is based on low kinematics disparity. Regardless of its restricted disparity, the grab-and-tearing feeding apparatus has enabled angelfishes to negotiate ecological thresholds: Given their widely different body sizes, angelfishes can access many structurally complex benthic surfaces that other biters likely are unable to exploit. From these surfaces, angelfishes can dislodge sturdy food items from their tough attachments. Angelfishes thus provide an intriguing example of a successful group that appears to have evolved considerable trophic diversity based on an unusual yet conserved feeding apparatus configuration that is characterized by limited functional disparity.
Authors:
Nicolai Konow; David R Bellwood
Related Documents :
10021414 - Chemoselective biosensors.
22209954 - The evolutionary origins and ecological context of tool use in new caledonian crows.
21645694 - Chemometrics optimization of carbohydrate separations in six food matrices by micellar ...
21854794 - Dehydration-anorexia derives from a reduction in meal size, but not meal number.
17936684 - Analysis of airborne microorganisms, mvoc and odour in the surrounding of composting fa...
11432484 - Fluoride content of infant formulas and market milk in turkey.
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2011-09-01
Journal Detail:
Title:  PloS one     Volume:  6     ISSN:  1932-6203     ISO Abbreviation:  PLoS ONE     Publication Date:  2011  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-09-12     Completed Date:  2012-01-05     Revised Date:  2013-06-27    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101285081     Medline TA:  PLoS One     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  e24113     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
School of Marine and Tropical Biology, and Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, Australia. nkonow@brown.edu
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Aquatic Organisms / physiology*
Biodiversity*
Biological Evolution*
Biomechanics
Body Size
Discriminant Analysis
Feeding Behavior / physiology*
Perciformes / anatomy & histology*,  physiology
Phylogeny
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Assessing natural resource use by forest-reliant communities in Madagascar using functional diversit...
Next Document:  Task-specific effects of tDCS-induced cortical excitability changes on cognitive and motor sequence ...