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Evidence of altered cardiac electrophysiology following prolonged androgenic anabolic steroid use.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21038102     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Process    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The non-therapeutic use of androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS) is associated with sudden cardiac death. Despite this, there is no proposed mechanism by which this may occur. Signal-averaged ECG (SAECG) allows the assessment of cardiac electrical stability, reductions of which are a known risk factor for cardiac arrhythmias. The aim of the present study was to examine cardiac electrical stability using SAECG in a group (n = 15) of long-term AAS users (AAS use 21.3 ± 3.1 years) compared with a group (n = 15) of age-matched weight lifters (WL) and age-matched sedentary controls [C (n = 15)]. AS, WL and C underwent SAECG analysis at rest and following an acute bout of exercise to volitional exhaustion. SAECGs were analyzed using a 40 Hz filter and were averaged over 200 beats. Results indicate a non-significant trend for increased incidence of abnormal SAECG measures at rest in AS (P = 0.55). However, AS demonstrated a significantly higher incidence of abnormalities of SAECG following exercise than C or WL (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the higher incidence of abnormal SAECG measurements immediately post-exercise in the AAS group places them at a greater risk of sudden death. The present study provides a strong contraindication to the use of AAS.
Authors:
Nicholas Sculthorpe; Fergal Grace; Peter Jones; Bruce Davies
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Cardiovascular toxicology     Volume:  10     ISSN:  1559-0259     ISO Abbreviation:  Cardiovasc. Toxicol.     Publication Date:  2010 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-11-24     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101135818     Medline TA:  Cardiovasc Toxicol     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  239-43     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Institute for Sport and Physical Activity Research, Department of Sport and Exercise Science, University of Bedfordshire, Polhill Avenue, Bedford MK41 9EA, UK. nick.sculthorpe@beds.ac.uk
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