Document Detail


Evaluation of a DVD for women with diabetes: impact on knowledge and attitudes to preconception care.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22416804     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
AIMS: To determine if an educational DVD increases knowledge and changes attitudes of women with diabetes towards preconception care.
METHODS: Ninety-seven women with diabetes (Type 1, n = 89; Type 2, n = 8), aged 18-40 years, completed a pre-DVD and post-DVD intervention study by postal questionnaire. Beliefs and attitudes associated with preventing an unplanned pregnancy and seeking preconception care were assessed using a validated questionnaire; scales included benefits, barriers, personal attitudes and self-efficacy. Knowledge of pregnancy planning and pregnancy-related risks were assessed by a 22-item questionnaire.
RESULTS: After viewing the DVD there was significant positive change in women's perceived benefits of, and their personal attitudes to, receiving preconception care and using contraception: change in score post-DVD viewing 0.7 (95% confidence interval 0.3, 1.2), P = 0.003, and 0.8 (0.3, 1.2), P = 0.001, respectively. The DVD significantly improved self-efficacy, that is, self-confidence to use contraception for prevention of an unplanned pregnancy and to access preconception care [3.3 (1.9, 4.7), P < 0.001], and significantly reduced perceived barriers to preconception care [-0.7 (-1.2, -0.2), P = 0.01]. Knowledge of pregnancy planning and pregnancy-related risks increased significantly after viewing the DVD: mean increase was 37.6 ± 20.0%, P < 0.001, and 16.9 ± 21.2%, P < 0.001, respectively.
CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates the effectiveness of a DVD in increasing knowledge and enhancing attitudes of women with diabetes to preconception care. This DVD could be used as a prepregnancy counselling resource to prepare women with diabetes for pregnancy.
Authors:
V A Holmes; M Spence; D R McCance; C C Patterson; R Harper; F A Alderdice
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association     Volume:  29     ISSN:  1464-5491     ISO Abbreviation:  Diabet. Med.     Publication Date:  2012 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-06-19     Completed Date:  2012-11-16     Revised Date:  2014-09-16    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8500858     Medline TA:  Diabet Med     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  950-6     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
© 2012 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2012 Diabetes UK.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 / epidemiology,  psychology*
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 / epidemiology,  psychology*
Family Planning Services / methods*
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice*
Humans
Marital Status
Northern Ireland / epidemiology
Patient Education as Topic
Preconception Care / methods*
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Diabetics / epidemiology,  psychology*
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Television*
Women's Health
Young Adult
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
07/0003548//Diabetes UK

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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