Document Detail


Evaluating the short-term cost-effectiveness of liraglutide versus sitagliptin in patients with type 2 diabetes failing metformin monotherapy in the United States.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23537458     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: Effective glycemic control can reduce the risk of serious micro- and macrovascular complications in type 2 diabetes. However, many patients fail to reach glycemic targets due partly to low efficacy and adverse effects of treatment such as hypoglycemia or weight gain.
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the short-term cost-effectiveness of liraglutide versus sitagliptin, in terms of cost per patient reaching a glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) target with no hypoglycemia and no weight gain after 52 weeks, based on a recently published trial. 
METHODS: Data were taken from a 52-week randomized, controlled trial (NCT00700817) in which adults with type 2 diabetes (mean age = 55 years, HbA1c = 8.4%, body mass index = 33 kg/m2) failing metformin monotherapy were randomly allocated to receive either liraglutide 1.2 mg, liraglutide 1.8 mg, or sitagliptin 100 mg daily, in addition to metformin. For the cost-effectiveness analysis, the proportion of patients achieving a clinically relevant composite endpoint, defined as HbA1c  less than  7.0%, with no reported hypoglycemia 
and no gain in body weight, was estimated using logistic regression. Trial data showed that 38.9% of patients on liraglutide 1.2 mg and 49.9% on liraglutide 1.8 mg achieved the composite endpoint, compared with 18.6% on sitagliptin at 52 weeks. Costs of antihyperglycemia medications were accounted for based on published wholesale acquisition costs in 2012 U.S. dollars. 
RESULTS: Overall pharmacy costs (needle costs included) were higher for patients on liraglutide than sitagliptin. The cost per patient achieving an HbA1c less than 7% was lowest for patients receiving liraglutide 1.2 mg ($7,993) and highest for patients receiving sitagliptin ($11,570). When expressed as the mean cost per patient reaching target HbA1c with no hypoglycemia or weight gain (cost of control), costs were notably lower on liraglutide than on sitagliptin. Annual mean costs of control were $10,335 on liraglutide 1.2 mg and $11,755 on liraglutide 1.8 mg versus $16,858 on sitagliptin.
CONCLUSION: The mean cost per patient achieving control, defined as reaching HbA1c target with no hypoglycemia or weight gain, was lower with liraglutide than with sitagliptin based on data from a recently published 52-week clinical trial. 
Authors:
Jakob Langer; Barnaby Hunt; William J Valentine
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of managed care pharmacy : JMCP     Volume:  19     ISSN:  1944-706X     ISO Abbreviation:  J Manag Care Pharm     Publication Date:  2013 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-03-29     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9605854     Medline TA:  J Manag Care Pharm     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  237-46     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Ossian Health Economics and Communications, Bäumleingasse 20, 4051 Basel, Switzerland. valentine@ossianconsulting.com.
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