Document Detail


Eumycetoma due to Madurella mycetomatis acquired in Jamaica.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  11899126     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
We report a case of eumycetoma due to Madurella mycetomatis affecting the left dorsal forefoot in a 35-year-old woman. She had spent her childhood in Jamaica, and had been resident in the U.K. for 20 years prior to her presentation. She gave a highly suggestive history for a mycetoma, having observed the intermittent discharge of black grains from the lesion. The diagnosis was confirmed by histological and mycological analysis of the grains, and a magnetic resonance imaging scan excluded osteomyelitis. She has responded very favourably to treatment with itraconazole. Mycetomas due to M. mycetomatis have not previously been reported from Jamaica.
Authors:
C L Fletcher; M K Moore; R J Hay
Related Documents :
21180506 - Recurrent plunging ranula.
24064176 - Conservative treatment of an aggressive odontogenic tumor: a case report.
Publication Detail:
Type:  Case Reports; Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The British journal of dermatology     Volume:  145     ISSN:  0007-0963     ISO Abbreviation:  Br. J. Dermatol.     Publication Date:  2001 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2002-03-18     Completed Date:  2002-03-26     Revised Date:  2008-11-21    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0004041     Medline TA:  Br J Dermatol     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1018-21     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
St John's Institute of Dermatology, London, UK. clfletcher@doctors.org.uk
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Foot Dermatoses / diagnosis*,  microbiology
Humans
Jamaica
Madurella*
Mycetoma / diagnosis*
Travel

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Generalized vitiligo after lymphocyte infusion for relapsed leukaemia.
Next Document:  Alterations in molecular killing mechanisms: implications in skin disease.