Document Detail


Ethnic disparity in the treatment of women with established low bone mass.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  12948109     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: To assess the extent of bone-health treatment and to test for racial differences in that treatment among black and white women with documented low bone mass. METHODS: All women who underwent central dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry testing at the Washington, DC Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) from January 1, 1998 through October 15, 2001 were identified via the VAMC's computerized patient record system. Self-administered questionnaires measuring patient demographics, fracture history, and presence of appropriate bone-health treatments were mailed to those with T scores < or = -1.0 (n=110). RESULTS: Seventy-five women (68%) completed the survey (mean 61 years old, 55% white and 35% black). There were no statistically significant differences between black and white women in smoking (71% nonsmokers), avoiding excess alcohol (95%), or exercising regularly (68%). Eighty-one percent reported taking calcium supplements, 71% vitamin D supplements, and 56% antiresorptive medications; whites were significantly more likely than blacks to be taking calcium supplements (90% v 69%, p=.048) and antiresorptive drugs (71% v 35%, p=.004). The racial difference in antiresorptive medication use remained significant after adjusting for bone loss severity and prior fractures (odds ratio 3.71; 95% confidence interval 1.24, 11.0). CONCLUSION: Women with low bone mass treated at the Washington, DC VAMC reported high rates of bone-building behaviors and the use of calcium and vitamin D supplements and somewhat lower rates of antiresorptive drug use. Whites were more likely than blacks to be taking calcium supplements and antiresorptive drugs. The causes of these disparities should be identified in future studies.
Authors:
Gina S Wei; Jeffrey L Jackson; Jerome E Herbers
Related Documents :
3722009 - A radiographic characterization of toe length disparity and its relation to nutrition a...
21246019 - Incomplete bone formation after sinus augmentation: a case report on radiological findi...
20646299 - Calcium from salmon and cod bone is well absorbed in young healthy men: a double-blinde...
21368129 - Late neandertals and the intentional removal of feathers as evidenced from bird bone ta...
24436759 - Chronic suppurative osteomyelitis of mandible: a case report.
11446559 - Changes in bone and calcium metabolism following hip fracture in elderly patients.
6572719 - The effect of electrosurgery on alveolar bone.
17442649 - Load distribution and the predictive power of morphological indices in the distal radiu...
18193199 - A new technique to improve tissue grip and contact force in arthroscopic capsulolabral ...
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of the American Medical Women's Association (1972)     Volume:  58     ISSN:  0098-8421     ISO Abbreviation:  J Am Med Womens Assoc     Publication Date:  2003  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2003-09-01     Completed Date:  2003-09-16     Revised Date:  2004-11-17    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7503064     Medline TA:  J Am Med Womens Assoc     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  173-7     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
African Americans*
Aged
Bone Density
Bone Diseases, Metabolic / drug therapy*
District of Columbia
European Continental Ancestry Group*
Female
Health Behavior
Hip Fractures / etiology
Hospitals, Veterans
Humans
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis* / complications,  etiology,  prevention & control

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  The role of factor V Leiden mutation in recurrent pregnancy loss.
Next Document:  Exercise counseling and personal exercise habits of US women physicians.