Document Detail


Epidemiological measures of participation in community health promotion projects.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  8557434     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: The paper is concerned with the use of epidemiological methods to measure the rates at which different strata of a defined population participate in community health promotion projects. The specific aim was to estimate the incidence rates of participation in projects sponsored by the Western Australian Health Promotion Foundation (Healthway), separately for sociodemographic and health-related behavioural subgroups. METHODS: Data were drawn from Healthway sponsorship projects in 1992. Each sport, arts and racing project was associated with promotion of a health message and creation of a health promoting environment. The study used a two-stage sampling design. Thirteen of 57 large sponsorship projects and 30 of 129 small projects were selected. In the second stage, respondents were randomly surveyed from among project participants. A total of 4060 respondents aged > or = 10 years was sampled from the 43 selected projects. Population-based incident participants were estimated and were related to person-years at risk. RESULTS: The total participation rate was 4.01 per person-year. The rate was very high at ages 10-14 years and thereafter declined with increasing age. Compared with the least socially disadvantaged 25% of population, the participation rate fell by around one-third in the medium and high disadvantage groups, but exceeded the baseline by a ratio of 1.85 (95% confidence interval: 1.57-2.18) in the most disadvantaged 10% of population. The effect was most pronounced at ages 10-19 years. Participation was higher in those who smoked, drank alcohol unsafely, reported sunburn and reported low consumption of fruit and vegetables. However, participation was reduced in people who were sedentary. CONCLUSIONS: Epidemiological methods can be used to evaluate the distribution of participation of a population in community health promotion projects. The Western Australian Health Promotion Foundation has been successful in reaching disadvantaged youth.
The paper is concerned with the use of epidemiological methods to measure the rates at which different strata of a defined population participate in community health promotion projects. The specific aim was to estimate the incidence rates of participation in projects sponsored by the Western Australian Health Promotion Foundation (Healthway), separately for sociodemographic and health-related behavioral subgroups. Data were drawn from Healthway sponsorship projects in 1992. Each sport, arts, and racing project was associated with promotion of a health message and creation of a health promoting environment. The study used a 2-stage sampling design. 13 of 57 large sponsorship projects and 30 of 129 small projects were selected. In the second stage, respondents were randomly surveyed from among project participants. A total of 4060 respondents at least 10 years old was sampled from the 43 selected projects. Population-based incident participation were estimated and were related to person-years at risk. The total participation rate was 4.01 per person-year in people or= 10 years old. The rate was very high at ages 10-14 years and thereafter declined with increasing age. Compared with the least socially disadvantaged 25% of the population, the participation rate fell by around 1/3 in the medium and high disadvantaged groups, but exceeded the baseline by a ratio of 1.85 (95% confidence interval: 1.57-2.18) in the most disadvantaged 10% of the population. The comparatively high rate of participation in the most disadvantaged group occurred only at ages 50 years and the effect was most pronounced at ages 10-19 years. Compared with the least disadvantaged 25%, the rate ratio in the most disadvantaged 10% of the population was 2.50 in the metropolitan area and 1.25 in the country regions of western Australia. Participation was higher in those who smoked, drank alcohol unsafely, reported sunburn, and reported low consumption of fruit and vegetables. Epidemiological methods can be used to evaluate the distribution of participation of a population in community health promotion projects.
Authors:
W H Oddy; C D Holman; B Corti; R J Donovan
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  International journal of epidemiology     Volume:  24     ISSN:  0300-5771     ISO Abbreviation:  Int J Epidemiol     Publication Date:  1995 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1996-02-28     Completed Date:  1996-02-28     Revised Date:  2010-03-24    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7802871     Medline TA:  Int J Epidemiol     Country:  ENGLAND    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1013-21     Citation Subset:  IM; J    
Affiliation:
Department of Public Health, University of Western Australia, Australia.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Community Health Services / utilization*
Epidemiologic Methods*
Female
Foundations
Health Behavior
Health Promotion*
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care / statistics & numerical data*
Program Evaluation / methods*
Socioeconomic Factors
Western Australia
Comments/Corrections
Comment In:
Int J Epidemiol. 1996 Jun;25(3):687-8   [PMID:  8671576 ]

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