Document Detail


Epicardial fibrosis mimicking a myocardial bridge.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  24834921     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Coronary artery compression during left ventricular systole is usually the result of a segment of coronary artery tunnelling within the myocardium, termed a 'myocardial bridge'. A 49-year-old man presented with acute anterior wall myocardial infarction thought to be secondary to a myocardial bridge seen during coronary arteriography; however, in the operating room the entire left anterior descending artery had a normal epicardial course without evidence of an intramyocardial segment, and coronary artery compression was the result of overlying fibrotic tissue, which was successfully excised. Overlying epicardial coronary artery fibrosis should be in the differential diagnosis of coronary artery compression.
Authors:
Konstantinos Dean Boudoulas; Ahmet Kilic
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2014-5-16
Journal Detail:
Title:  Interactive cardiovascular and thoracic surgery     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1569-9285     ISO Abbreviation:  Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg     Publication Date:  2014 May 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2014-5-19     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101158399     Medline TA:  Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
© The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.
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