Document Detail


Enhanced change detection performance reveals improved strategy use in avid action video game players.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21062660     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Process    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Recent research has shown that avid action video game players (VGPs) outperform non-video game players (NVGPs) on a variety of attentional and perceptual tasks. However, it remains unknown exactly why and how such differences arise; while some prior research has demonstrated that VGPs' improvements stem from enhanced basic perceptual processes, other work indicates that they can stem from enhanced attentional control. The current experiment used a change-detection task to explore whether top-down strategies can contribute to VGPs' improved abilities. Participants viewed alternating presentations of an image and a modified version of the image and were tasked with detecting and localizing the changed element. Consistent with prior claims of enhanced perceptual abilities, VGPs were able to detect the changes while requiring less exposure to the change than NVGPs. Further analyses revealed this improved change detection performance may result from altered strategy use; VGPs employed broader search patterns when scanning scenes for potential changes. These results complement prior demonstrations of VGPs' enhanced bottom-up perceptual benefits by providing new evidence of VGPs' potentially enhanced top-down strategic benefits.
Authors:
Kait Clark; Mathias S Fleck; Stephen R Mitroff
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.     Date:  2010-11-09
Journal Detail:
Title:  Acta psychologica     Volume:  136     ISSN:  1873-6297     ISO Abbreviation:  Acta Psychol (Amst)     Publication Date:  2011 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-01-10     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0370366     Medline TA:  Acta Psychol (Amst)     Country:  Netherlands    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  67-72     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Department of Psychology & Neuroscience, Duke University, United States. kait.clark@duke.edu
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