Document Detail


Energy intake and exercise as determinants of brain health and vulnerability to injury and disease.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23168220     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Evolution favored individuals with superior cognitive and physical abilities under conditions of limited food sources, and brain function can therefore be optimized by intermittent dietary energy restriction (ER) and exercise. Such energetic challenges engage adaptive cellular stress-response signaling pathways in neurons involving neurotrophic factors, protein chaperones, DNA-repair proteins, autophagy, and mitochondrial biogenesis. By suppressing adaptive cellular stress responses, overeating and a sedentary lifestyle may increase the risk of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, stroke, and depression. Intense concerted efforts of governments, families, schools, and physicians will be required to successfully implement brain-healthy lifestyles that incorporate ER and exercise.
Authors:
Mark P Mattson
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural; Review     Date:  2012-11-15
Journal Detail:
Title:  Cell metabolism     Volume:  16     ISSN:  1932-7420     ISO Abbreviation:  Cell Metab.     Publication Date:  2012 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-12-10     Completed Date:  2013-05-22     Revised Date:  2013-12-11    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101233170     Medline TA:  Cell Metab     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  706-22     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Brain / metabolism*
Caloric Restriction
Energy Intake*
Exercise*
Humans
Neurodegenerative Diseases / diet therapy,  metabolism,  pathology
Neurons / metabolism
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
ZIA AG000312-11/AG/NIA NIH HHS; ZIA AG000312-12/AG/NIA NIH HHS; ZIA AG000313-11/AG/NIA NIH HHS; ZIA AG000313-12/AG/NIA NIH HHS; ZIA AG000314-11/AG/NIA NIH HHS; ZIA AG000314-12/AG/NIA NIH HHS; ZIA AG000315-11/AG/NIA NIH HHS; ZIA AG000315-12/AG/NIA NIH HHS; ZIA AG000317-11/AG/NIA NIH HHS; ZIA AG000317-12/AG/NIA NIH HHS; ZIA AG000324-10/AG/NIA NIH HHS; ZIA AG000330-04/AG/NIA NIH HHS; ZIA AG000331-04/AG/NIA NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

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