Document Detail


Endurance exercise performance in Masters athletes: age-associated changes and underlying physiological mechanisms.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  17717011     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Older ('Masters') athletes strive to maintain or even improve upon the performance they achieved at younger ages, but declines in athletic performance are inevitable with ageing. In this review, we describe changes in peak endurance exercise performance with advancing age as well as physiological factors responsible for those changes. Peak endurance performance is maintained until approximately 35 years of age, followed by modest decreases until 50-60 years of age, with progressively steeper declines thereafter. Among the three main physiological determinants of endurance exercise performance (i.e. maximal oxygen consumption , lactate threshold and exercise economy), a progressive reduction in appears to be the primary mechanism associated with declines in endurance performance with age. A reduction in lactate threshold, i.e. the exercise intensity at which blood lactate concentration increases significantly above baseline, also contributes to the reduction in endurance performance with ageing, although this may be secondary to decreases in . In contrast, exercise economy (i.e. metabolic cost of sustained submaximal exercise) does not change with age in endurance-trained adults. Decreases in maximal stroke volume, heart rate and arterio-venous O(2) difference all appear to contribute to the age-related reductions in in endurance-trained athletes. Declines in endurance exercise performance and its physiological determinants with ageing appear to be mediated in large part by a reduction in the intensity (velocity) and volume of the exercise that can be performed during training sessions. Given their impressive peak performance capability and physiological function capacity, Masters athletes remain a fascinating model of 'exceptionally successful ageing' and therefore are highly deserving of our continued scientific attention as physiologists.
Authors:
Hirofumi Tanaka; Douglas R Seals
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Review     Date:  2007-08-23
Journal Detail:
Title:  The Journal of physiology     Volume:  586     ISSN:  0022-3751     ISO Abbreviation:  J. Physiol. (Lond.)     Publication Date:  2008 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2008-01-02     Completed Date:  2008-05-19     Revised Date:  2013-06-06    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0266262     Medline TA:  J Physiol     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  55-63     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Kinesiology and Health Education, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA. htanaka@mail.utexas.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Aging / physiology*
Athletic Performance / physiology*
Cardiovascular Physiological Phenomena
Exercise / physiology
Humans
Lactates / metabolism
Middle Aged
Oxygen Consumption / physiology
Physical Endurance / physiology*
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Lactates
Comments/Corrections

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