Document Detail


Endovascular stenting of ascending lumbar veins for refractory inferior vena cava occlusion.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  17012012     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Chronic inferior vena cava (IVC) occlusion is a debilitating disease process. Recently, endovascular techniques have been described using progressive balloon dilatation and stenting to treat IVC occlusion with reasonable success. We present two cases of endovascular dilatation and stenting of the ascending lumbar vein. This technique provided good early relief of symptoms with ulcer healing, decreased swelling, and decreased pain. To our knowledge this is the first report of endovascular therapy of IVC occlusion via stenting of the ascending lumbar vein. This technique may provide a feasible treatment option when the occluded IVC cannot be reopened.
Authors:
Christopher T Healey; Neil Halin; Mark Iafrati
Publication Detail:
Type:  Case Reports; Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of vascular surgery     Volume:  44     ISSN:  0741-5214     ISO Abbreviation:  J. Vasc. Surg.     Publication Date:  2006 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2006-10-02     Completed Date:  2006-10-26     Revised Date:  2012-10-03    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8407742     Medline TA:  J Vasc Surg     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  879-81     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
New England Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation / instrumentation*
Constriction, Pathologic
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lumbosacral Region / blood supply*
Male
Middle Aged
Phlebography
Stents*
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Vascular Diseases / radiography,  surgery*
Vena Cava, Inferior*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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