Document Detail


Endogenous gut nitrogen losses in growing pigs are not caused by increased protein synthesis rates in the small intestine.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  10702586     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The purpose of this study was to establish, using a flooding dose of L-[ring 2, 6-(3)H] phenylalanine, whether feeding pigs diets that induce high endogenous gut nitrogen losses (ENL) also increases protein synthesis rates in (PSR) the visceral organs. Twelve 18-kg Yorkshire barrows with catheters in the right and left jugular veins were fed for 3 wk either casein-cornstarch- (CC) or barley-canola meal- (BCM) based diets formulated to a similar digestible energy /crude protein ratio and designed to induce either low or high ENL, respectively. Pigs were infused with 10 mL/kg body weight of a 150 mmol. L(-1) phenylalanine solution containing 230 MBq. L(-1) labeled phenylalanine for 12 min and killed 20 min later. Plasma phenylalanine specific radioactivity (SRA) rose to a plateau value within 3 min of starting the infusion and did not change (P > 0.10) thereafter. Fractional rates of protein synthesis (K(s), %/d) based on SRA in plasma- or intracellular-free phenylalanine did not differ (P > 0.10) in all tissues except pancreas (P < 0.05). Diet affected K(s )in liver (P < 0.01) and colon (P < 0.05) but not in pancreas, duodenum, jejunum and cecum. Based on plasma-free phenylalanine SRA, liver K(s)were 85.4 +/- 11.0 vs. 60.5 +/- 5.2 (mean +/- SEM) in CC- and BCM-fed pigs, respectively; these values were 82.3 +/- 4.7 vs. 98.2 +/- 5.8 in the colon. The absolute amount of protein synthesis (g.d(-1)) was higher in the liver (P < 0.05) and pancreas (P < 0. 05) of the CC pigs compared to BCM pigs. No dietary effects were observed in all other organs (P > 0.10). The present results suggest that feeding growing pigs a BCM diet that induces high ENL does not affect PSR in the small intestine of growing pigs from which >50% of ENL originates.
Authors:
C M Nyachoti; C F de Lange; B W McBride; S Leeson; V M Gabert
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The Journal of nutrition     Volume:  130     ISSN:  0022-3166     ISO Abbreviation:  J. Nutr.     Publication Date:  2000 Mar 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2000-03-24     Completed Date:  2000-03-24     Revised Date:  2006-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0404243     Medline TA:  J Nutr     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  566-72     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 2W1.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Blood Glucose / drug effects
Diet*
Growth
Intestine, Small / drug effects*,  metabolism*
Liver / metabolism
Male
Nitrogen / metabolism*
Pancreas / metabolism
Phenylalanine / administration & dosage,  metabolism,  toxicity*
Protein Biosynthesis*
Swine
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Blood Glucose; 63-91-2/Phenylalanine; 7727-37-9/Nitrogen

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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