Document Detail


Emerging trends in breastfeeding practices in Singaporean Chinese women: findings from a population-based study.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20237728     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
INTRODUCTION: This study records the prevalence and patterns of breastfeeding in Singaporean Chinese mothers who gave birth between 2000 and 2008. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Strabismus, Amblyopia and Refractive Error in Singaporean Children (STARS) study is a population-based survey conducted in South-Western Singapore. Disproportionate random sampling by 6-month age groups of Chinese children born from 2000 to 2008 was performed. The mothers (n = 3009) completed a standard questionnaire which recorded the initiation, content, method and duration of breastfeeding. World Health Organization (WHO) definitions for feeding content were used: Replacement (exclusive commercial formula or any liquid or solid/semi-solid food, excluding breast milk), Complementary (breast milk, solid/semi-solid foods, and any non-human liquid), and Exclusive (breast milk only, without additional food, drink or water). STARS-specific definitions for feeding method were used: Expressed (breast milk only fed via bottle, with no additional food or non-human liquid), Combination (breast milk and non-breast milk, fed via bottle and breast), and Direct (breast milk only fed via breast). RESULTS: Breastfeeding initiation (overall prevalence 77.0%) and duration increased over time, and were independently associated with higher maternal education: in 2000 and 2001, 68.6% of mothers initiated breastfeeding and 12.9% breast fed for <or=6 months, versus 82.0% and 26.7%, respectively, from 2006 to 2008; 47.4% of primary-school-educated women initiated breastfeeding, and 11.1% fed for >or=6 months, vs 90.9% and 35.3%, respectively, of university-educated women (P <0.001). Expressed, Combination and Complementary feeding also increased, while Replacement feeding decreased (P <0.001). There was no difference in breastfeeding patterns by the child's gender. CONCLUSIONS: In a population-based sample of Singaporean Chinese mothers giving birth from 2000 to 2008, breastfeeding initiation and duration increased over time and were independently associated with higher maternal education. This increase was associated with increased milk expression and complementary feeding. Thus awareness of breastfeeding benefits is rising in Singapore, but future health policies may need to target less-educated mothers.
Authors:
Dana M Hornbeak; Mohamed Dirani; Wai Kit Sham; Jialiang Li; Terri L Young; Tien Yin Wong; Yap Seng Chong; Seang Mei Saw
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Annals of the Academy of Medicine, Singapore     Volume:  39     ISSN:  0304-4602     ISO Abbreviation:  Ann. Acad. Med. Singap.     Publication Date:  2010 Feb 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-03-18     Completed Date:  2010-07-13     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7503289     Medline TA:  Ann Acad Med Singapore     Country:  Singapore    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  88-94     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Duke-National University of Singapore Graduate Medical School, Singapore.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Breast Feeding / epidemiology*,  ethnology
Child
Child, Preschool
China / ethnology
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Mothers*
Questionnaires
Singapore / epidemiology

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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