Document Detail


Embryonic and early fetal development of human lung vasculature and its functional implications.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  10890928     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Recently, we have identified in the mouse three processes involved in the early development of pulmonary vasculature: angiogenesis for branching of central vessels, vasculogenesis (lakes in the mesenchyme) for peripheral vessels, and a lytic process to establish luminal connection between the two. We have established that these three processes also operate in the human by studying serial sections of human embryos and early fetuses. Vascular lakes of hematopoietic cells appear at stage 13, i.e., 4+ weeks gestational age (GA), the first intrapulmonary vascular structure to appear. At stage 20 (50.5 days GA), a venous network with luminal connections to central pulmonary veins (PV) is present. Airways have not yet reached these regions of lung. At its first intrapulmonary appearance, the pulmonary artery (PA) is small and thick walled: it runs with the airway but its branching is slower, so many peripheral airways are not accompanied by a PA branch. By contrast, the PV has a peripheral patent network well before the PA. In the pseudoglandular phase, airway branching continues, and the PA catches up so that small PA branches are found with all airways. Later in this phase small nonmuscular vessels lie in the mesenchyme close to airway epithelium. By the early canalicular phase and the age of viability, continuity between pulmonary artery and the peripheral capillary network must be established. In a 10-week fetus several structures suggesting a breakthrough site were seen. Air-blood barrier structure is first seen at 19 weeks. Thus in the lung, the PA and PV are dissociated in their timing and pattern of branching. Early veins are present diffusely through the mesenchyme and establish central luminal connection to the main pulmonary vein before airway or artery are present at this level.
Authors:
D E deMello; L M Reid
Related Documents :
12143958 - Mönckeberg's sclerosis: an unusual presentation--a case report.
6622688 - Work in progress: transcatheter embolization with cyanoacrylate and nitrocellulose.
7276878 - Office doppler techniques in vascular disease.
3079838 - Peripheral artery and bypass graft thrombolysis with recombinant human tissue-type plas...
3292338 - Ultrasound-assisted percutaneous liver biopsy: superiority of the tru-cut over the meng...
1486248 - Fine-bore peripheral catheters versus central venous catheters for delivery of intraven...
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Pediatric and developmental pathology : the official journal of the Society for Pediatric Pathology and the Paediatric Pathology Society     Volume:  3     ISSN:  1093-5266     ISO Abbreviation:  Pediatr. Dev. Pathol.     Publication Date:    2000 Sep-Oct
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2000-08-25     Completed Date:  2000-08-25     Revised Date:  2007-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9809673     Medline TA:  Pediatr Dev Pathol     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  439-49     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Pathology, St. Louis University Health Sciences Center and Cardinal Glennon Children's Hospital, 1465 South Grand Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63104, USA.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Blood Vessels / embryology
Embryo, Mammalian / physiology*
Embryonic and Fetal Development*
Female
Fetus / embryology*
Gestational Age
Humans
Lung / blood supply*,  embryology*
Male
Neovascularization, Physiologic*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
HL55600/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Very low birthweight placenta: clustering of morphologic characteristics.
Next Document:  Renal developmental delay expressed by reduced glomerular number and its association with growth ret...