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Embolisation of a bronchial artery of anomalous origin in massive haemoptysis.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22135550     Owner:  NLM     Status:  PubMed-not-MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Massive haemoptysis is the most dreaded of all respiratory emergencies. Bronchial artery embolisation is known to be a safe and effective procedure in massive haemoptysis. Bronchial artery of anomalous origin presents a diagnostic challenge to interventional radiologists searching for the source of haemorrhage. Here, we report a case of massive haemoptysis secondary to a lung carcinoma with the bronchial artery originating directly from the right subclavian artery. This artery was not evident during the initial flush thoracic aortogram. The anomalous-origin bronchial artery was then embolised using 15% diluted glue with good results. An anomalous-origin bronchial artery should be suspected if the source of haemorrhage is not visualised in the normally expected bronchial artery location.
Authors:
Ahmad Razali Md Ralib; Ng Teck Han; How Soon Hin; Ahmad Sobri Muda
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The Malaysian journal of medical sciences : MJMS     Volume:  17     ISSN:  2180-4303     ISO Abbreviation:  Malays J Med Sci     Publication Date:  2010 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-12-02     Completed Date:  2012-10-02     Revised Date:  2013-05-29    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101126308     Medline TA:  Malays J Med Sci     Country:  Malaysia    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  55-60     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Department of Radiology, Kulliyyah of Medicine, International Islamic University Malaysia, 25710 Kuantan, Pahang, Malaysia.
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