Document Detail


Efficacy of food fortification on serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations: systematic review.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  19064512     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: Many residents of the United States and Canada depend on dietary sources of vitamin D to help maintain vitamin D status. Because few natural food sources contain vitamin D, fortified foods may be required. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to determine the effects of vitamin D-fortified foods on serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations. DESIGN: We searched MEDLINE (1966 to June Week 3 2006), Embase, CINAHL, AMED, Biological Abstracts, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing vitamin D-fortified foods with a control and reporting serum 25(OH)D concentrations. Two reviewers independently determined study eligibility, assessed trial quality, and extracted relevant data. Disagreements were resolved by consensus. Meta-analyses of absolute mean change in 25(OH)D were conducted by using a random-effects model, with evaluation of heterogeneity. RESULTS: Nine RCTs (n = 889 subjects) were included, of which 8 consistently showed a significant beneficial effect of food fortification on 25(OH)D concentrations. Although 7 RCTs (n = 585 subjects) potentially were meta-analyzable, we were unable to combine the overall results because of significant heterogeneity. The individual treatment effects ranged from 14.5 (95% CIs: 10.6, 18.4) nmol/L to 34.5 (17.64, 51.36) nmol/L (3.4-25 microg vitamin D/d). Subgroup analyses showed a reduction in heterogeneity and significant treatment effect when 4 trials that used milk as the fortified food source were combined. CONCLUSION: Most trials were small in size and inadequately reported allocation concealment, but results showed that vitamin D-fortified foods improved vitamin D status in adults.
Authors:
Siobhan O'Donnell; Ann Cranney; Tanya Horsley; Hope A Weiler; Stephanie A Atkinson; David A Hanley; Daylily S Ooi; Leanne Ward; Nick Barrowman; Manchun Fang; Margaret Sampson; Alexander Tsertsvadze; Fatemeh Yazdi
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Meta-Analysis; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The American journal of clinical nutrition     Volume:  88     ISSN:  1938-3207     ISO Abbreviation:  Am. J. Clin. Nutr.     Publication Date:  2008 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2008-12-09     Completed Date:  2009-01-13     Revised Date:  2009-05-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0376027     Medline TA:  Am J Clin Nutr     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1528-34     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Health Research Institute, Ottawa, Canada.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Bone Density Conservation Agents / administration & dosage*
Female
Food, Fortified*
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Milk / chemistry*
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Nutritional Status*
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Treatment Outcome
Vitamin D / administration & dosage*,  analogs & derivatives*,  blood
Young Adult
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
290-020-0021//PHS HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Bone Density Conservation Agents; 1406-16-2/Vitamin D; 64719-49-9/25-hydroxyvitamin D

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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