Document Detail


Effects of food restriction on glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, and islet-cell proliferation in pregnant rats.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  10073466     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Pregnancy is associated with increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and increased pancreatic islet-cell proliferation. In the present study it was investigated whether increased food intake, as occurs during pregnancy, is involved in the regulation of these phenomena. From Day 0 of pregnancy, rats received each day the mean amount of food they consumed daily during the estrous cycle prior to conception. This food restriction regime resulted in lower maternal body weight, and in lower fetal weight on Day 20 of gestation, but did not affect fetal survival. Food-restricted rats showed decreased insulin responses to an i.v. glucose challenge on Day 13, and lower islet-cell replication rates on Day 14 of pregnancy than pregnant rats fed ad lib. Plasma lactogenic activity in food-restricted animals was increased on Days 11 and 13; plasma progesterone levels were unchanged, but plasma leptin concentrations declined progressively during food restriction. Glucose tolerance was normal, suggesting that food restriction improved insulin action. On Day 20 of pregnancy, insulin responses were similar in food restricted and ad lib-fed rats; glucose tolerance was still unchanged. It thus seems that the improved insulin action as present on Day 13 had disappeared on Day 20. Also on Day 20, lactogenic activity as well as progesterone concentrations were similar in food-restricted and ad lib-fed rats. It was concluded that increased food intake plays an important role in the stimulation of islet-cell proliferation and insulin secretion, as well as in the diminished insulin action during the second week of rat pregnancy.
Authors:
A G Nieuwenhuizen; G A Schuiling; A F Seijsener; H Moes; T R Koiter
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Physiology & behavior     Volume:  65     ISSN:  0031-9384     ISO Abbreviation:  Physiol. Behav.     Publication Date:    1999 Jan 1-15
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1999-05-17     Completed Date:  1999-05-17     Revised Date:  2003-11-14    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0151504     Medline TA:  Physiol Behav     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  671-7     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, University of Groningen, The Netherlands. a.g.nieuwenhuizen@med.rug.nl
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Body Weight / physiology
Cell Division / physiology
Eating / physiology
Fatty Acids, Nonesterified / blood
Female
Food Deprivation / physiology*
Glucose / physiology*
Glucose Tolerance Test
Insulin / metabolism*
Islets of Langerhans / physiology*
Leptin
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome
Pregnancy, Animal / physiology*
Progesterone / blood
Prolactin / metabolism
Proteins / metabolism
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Fatty Acids, Nonesterified; 0/Leptin; 0/Proteins; 11061-68-0/Insulin; 50-99-7/Glucose; 57-83-0/Progesterone; 9002-62-4/Prolactin

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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