Document Detail


Effects of cues associated with meal interruption on feeding behavior.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  19501768     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Food consumption is controlled by both internal and external factors. Environmental signals associated with food may prepare an animal to forage, consume and digest more effectively. Furthermore, environmental cues that provide information about food availability enable animals to make predictions about future food resources and act upon that knowledge in appropriate fashion. For example, when exposed to a cue that signals the presence of food, animals can eat beyond their present needs to cope with predicted future famine. Interestingly, cues previously paired with meal interruption have a similar effect. In two experiments, food-deprived rats learned to associate one conditioned stimulus (CS+) with delivery of a food unconditioned stimulus (US), and another stimulus (IS) with an unexpected termination of CS-US trials. Subsequently, both CS+ and IS enhanced consumption of the US food by sated rats. The results of Experiment 2 indicated that IS's ability to potentiate feeding of sated rats in test depended more on its accompanying CS+ termination in training than on its signaling reductions in US frequency. These experiments may provide a novel animal model of binge-like behaviors in sated rats induced by external cues paired with meal interruption.
Authors:
Ezequiel M Galarce; Peter C Holland
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural     Date:  2009-03-28
Journal Detail:
Title:  Appetite     Volume:  52     ISSN:  1095-8304     ISO Abbreviation:  Appetite     Publication Date:  2009 Jun 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2009-06-08     Completed Date:  2009-09-29     Revised Date:  2014-09-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8006808     Medline TA:  Appetite     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  693-702     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Association Learning / physiology
Behavior, Animal
Bulimia / psychology*
Conditioning (Psychology)*
Conditioning, Classical / physiology
Consummatory Behavior / physiology
Cues*
Eating / physiology,  psychology
Environment
Feeding Behavior / physiology*,  psychology*
Food Supply
Hyperphagia / psychology
Male
Rats
Rats, Long-Evans
Reinforcement (Psychology)
Satiation / physiology
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
MH53667/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; MH65879/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; R01 MH065879/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; R01 MH065879-05/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; R37 MH053667/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; R37 MH053667-13/MH/NIMH NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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