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Effects of vibrations on gastrocnemius medialis tissue oxygenation.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20689452     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
PURPOSE: : Whole-body vibrations are known to affect muscle activity and tissue oxygenation, but some energetic aspects are still poorly understood. This study investigates the effects of whole-body vibration on gastrocnemius muscle oxygen utilization rate and tissue oxygenation dynamics during exercise.
METHODS: : The effects of vibration on gastrocnemius medialis muscle oxygenation were investigated during a dynamic exercise on a sample of 16 active male subjects (age = 26.3 ± 5.1 yr, mass = 71.2 ± 4.8 kg (mean ± SD)). Both arterially occluded (AO) and nonoccluded (N/O) conditions were investigated. Tissue oxygenation was monitored with a near-infrared spectrometer. Oxygen utilization rate and tissue oxygenation recovery were computed as the slopes of the regression line of the oxygenation decay and recovery, respectively. A fast Fourier transform (FFT) was used to determine the frequency spectrum of the oxygen saturation data. EMG activity was monitored using bipolar EMG electrodes. A windowed root mean square analysis was used to monitor the amplitude of the EMG signal.
RESULTS: : A statistically significant increase of 15% (P < 0.05) in oxygen utilization rate was found for the vibration condition in the AO leg but not in the N/O leg. The oxygenation recovery rate for the vibration condition was 34% higher (P < 0.05) than that for the control condition. A low-frequency periodic oscillation (T ≍ 10 s) in the tissue oxygenation data was determined from the FFT spectrum. A statistically significant decrease in the oscillation frequency was noticed for the vibration condition compared with the control.
CONCLUSIONS: : Vibrations increased the oxygen utilization rate during a dynamic exercise. The oxygenation recovery rate increased with vibrations. The low-frequency oscillation of the oxygenation was attributed to the periodic changes in tissue blood flow, and this seems to be influenced by vibrations.
Authors:
Aurel Coza; Benno M Nigg; Jeff F Dunn
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Medicine and science in sports and exercise     Volume:  43     ISSN:  1530-0315     ISO Abbreviation:  Med Sci Sports Exerc     Publication Date:  2011 Mar 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-02-17     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8005433     Medline TA:  Med Sci Sports Exerc     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  509-15     Citation Subset:  IM; S    
Affiliation:
1Human Performance Laboratory, Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, Calgary, CANADA; and 2Experimental Imaging Centre and Department of Radiology, University of Calgary, Calgary, CANADA.
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