Document Detail


Effects of Enterococcus faecium and dried whey on broiler performance, gut histomorphology and intestinal microbiota.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  17361947     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The experiment was conducted to study the effects of supplementing a broiler starter diet with the probiotic Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 and dried whey (80% lactose) on chick performance, gut histomorphology and intestinal microbiota. One-day-old male Ross 308 strain broiler chickens were fed diets containing: (i) control feed, (ii) control + 3.5% dried whey, (iii) control + 0.2% E. faecium, and (iv) control + 3.5% dried whey + 0.2% E. faecium. Birds were maintained in battery brooders confined in an environmentally controlled experimental room. The experiment lasted for 21 days. Birds fed E. faecium or E. faecium + dried whey exhibited significantly improved weight gain and feed conversion rate (FCR). Weight gain and FCR of treatment groups 1-4 were 628.7, 657.8, 690.9, 689.3 and 1.218, 1.193, 1.107, 1.116, respectively. Lactic acid bacteria counts in both the ileal content and excreta were significantly affected by dietary treatment. Supplementation of the E. faecium and dried whey separately and in combination increased lactic acid bacteria colonization in the ileal content from 4.2 to 5.0, 7.8 and to 5.1 log cfu/g, respectively (treatments 1-4). Similarly, supplementation of dried whey and E. faecium separately and in combination increased lactic acid bacteria in the excreta from 5.3 to 5.5, 8.0 and to 7.2 log cfu/g, respectively. Addition of the probiotic E. faecium increased villus height in the ileum (p < 0.05). Thus, supplementation of E. faecium enhanced broiler chick performance with respect to weight gain and FCR. No additive effect of E. faecium and dried whey was detected. Further studies are needed to investigate the relationship between E. faecium and dried whey with respect to gut histomorphology.
Authors:
Hasan Ersin Samli; Nizamettin Senkoylu; Fisun Koc; Mehmet Kanter; Aylin Agma
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Archives of animal nutrition     Volume:  61     ISSN:  1745-039X     ISO Abbreviation:  -     Publication Date:  2007 Feb 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2007-03-16     Completed Date:  2007-04-17     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101222433     Medline TA:  Arch Anim Nutr     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  42-9     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Namik Kemal University, Department of Animal Science, Tekirdag, Turkey. ersinsamli@yahoo.com
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Chickens / growth & development*
Colony Count, Microbial
Enterococcus faecium / growth & development*,  physiology
Ileum / microbiology,  pathology
Intestines / microbiology*,  pathology*
Lactobacillus / growth & development*
Male
Milk Proteins / administration & dosage*,  metabolism
Probiotics
Random Allocation
Weight Gain / drug effects
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Milk Proteins; 0/whey protein

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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