Document Detail


Effects of 24 weeks of whole body vibration training on body composition and muscle strength in untrained females.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  14750005     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The aim of this study was to investigate and to compare the effect of 24 weeks "whole body vibration" training and fitness training on body composition and on muscle strength. Forty-eight untrained females (21.3 +/- 2.0 yr) participated in the study. The whole body vibration group (N = 18) performed unloaded static and dynamic exercises on a vibration platform (35 - 40 Hz, 2.5 - 5.0 mm; Power Plate). The fitness group (N = 18) followed a standard cardiovascular (15 - 40 min) and resistance training program including dynamic leg press and leg extension exercises (20 - 8 RM). Both groups trained 3 times weekly. The control group (N = 12) did not participate in any training. Body composition was determined by means of underwater weighing. Additionally 12 skinfolds were assessed. Isometric (0 degrees /s) and isokinetic (50 degrees /s, 100 degrees /s, 150 degrees /s) knee-extensor strength was measured by means of a motor-driven dynamometer (Technogym). Over 24 weeks there were no significant changes (p > 0.05) in weight, in percentage body fat, nor in skinfold thickness in any of the groups. Fat free mass increased significantly in the whole body vibration group (+ 2.2 %) only. A significant strength gain was recorded in the whole body vibration group (24.4 +/- 5.1 %; 5.9 +/- 2.1 %; 8.3 +/- 4.4 %; 7.6 +/- 1.5 %) and in the fitness group (16.5 +/- 1.7 %; 12.0 +/- 2.7 %; 10.4 +/- 2.3 %; 10.2 +/- 1.9 %), at 0 degrees /s, 50 degrees /s, 100 degrees /s and 150 degrees /s respectively. In conclusion, 24 weeks whole body vibration training did not reduce weight, total body fat or subcutaneous fat in previously untrained females. However, whole body vibration training induces a gain in knee-extensor strength combined with a small increase in fat free mass. The gain in strength is comparable to the strength increase following a standard fitness training program consisting of cardiovascular and resistance training.
Authors:
M Roelants; C Delecluse; M Goris; S Verschueren
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  International journal of sports medicine     Volume:  25     ISSN:  0172-4622     ISO Abbreviation:  Int J Sports Med     Publication Date:  2004 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2004-01-29     Completed Date:  2004-04-06     Revised Date:  2004-11-17    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8008349     Medline TA:  Int J Sports Med     Country:  Germany    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1-5     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Exercise Physiology and Biomechanics Laboratory, Faculty of Physical Education and Physiotherapy, Department of Kinesiology, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Tervuursevest 101, 3001 Leuven, Belgium.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Body Composition*
Exercise Therapy
Female
Humans
Knee Joint / physiology
Muscle, Skeletal / physiology*
Physical Endurance
Time Factors
Vibration / therapeutic use*

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