Document Detail


Effect of exercise and nasal splinting on static and dynamic measures of nasal airflow.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  10824642     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The main aim of this study was to assess the separate and combined effects of exercise and nasal splinting on static and dynamic measures of nasal airflow. In a randomized crossover design, 12 healthy participants (6 men, 6 women) performed static and dynamic spirometric nasal airflow assessment tests, with or without nasal splinting (Breathe-Right), before and after a maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) treadmill test. At least 7 days later, the VO2max, and nasal airflow tests were repeated. The results showed that the measured variables were not significantly different with and without nasal splinting. We conclude that the absence of significantly enhanced nasal patency observed for nasal splinting and after exercise suggest that these factors have a minimal impact on nasal airflow volume and rate.
Authors:
E W Faria; C Foster; I E Faria
Publication Detail:
Type:  Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of sports sciences     Volume:  18     ISSN:  0264-0414     ISO Abbreviation:  J Sports Sci     Publication Date:  2000 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2000-08-09     Completed Date:  2000-08-09     Revised Date:  2004-11-17    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8405364     Medline TA:  J Sports Sci     Country:  ENGLAND    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  255-61     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Center for Exercise and Applied Human Physiology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque 87131, USA. fariaie@csus.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Airway Resistance
Analysis of Variance
Cross-Over Studies
Exercise*
Female
Humans
Male
Nasal Cavity / physiology*
Probability
Pulmonary Ventilation / physiology*
Respiration
Spirometry
Splints*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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