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Effect of dietary linoleic Acid on markers of inflammation in healthy persons: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22889633     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The majority of evidence suggests that n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, including linoleic acid (LA), reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease as reflected by current dietary recommendations. However, concern has been expressed that a high intake of dietary n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid contributes to excess chronic inflammation, primarily by prompting the synthesis of proinflammatory eicosanoids derived from arachidonic acid and/or inhibiting the synthesis of anti-inflammatory eicosanoids from eicosapentaenoic and/or docosahexaenoic acids. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials that permitted the assessment of dietary LA on biologic markers of chronic inflammation among healthy noninfant populations was conducted to examine this concern. A search of the English- and non-English-language literature using MEDLINE, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, and EMBASE was conducted to identify relevant articles. Fifteen studies (eight parallel and seven crossover) met inclusion criteria. None of the studies reported significant findings for a wide variety of inflammatory markers, including C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, cytokines, soluble vascular adhesion molecules, or tumor necrosis factor-α. The only significant outcome measures reported for higher LA intakes were greater excretion of prostaglandin E2 and lower excretion of 2,3-dinor-thromboxane B(2) in one study and higher excretion of tetranorprostanedioic acid in another. However, the authors of those studies both observed that these effects were not an indication of increased inflammation. We conclude that virtually no evidence is available from randomized, controlled intervention studies among healthy, noninfant human beings to show that addition of LA to the diet increases the concentration of inflammatory markers.
Authors:
Guy H Johnson; Kevin Fritsche
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics     Volume:  112     ISSN:  2212-2672     ISO Abbreviation:  J Acad Nutr Diet     Publication Date:  2012 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-08-14     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101573920     Medline TA:  J Acad Nutr Diet     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1029-1041.e15     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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