Document Detail


The effect of prenatal methamphetamine exposure on attention as assessed by continuous performance tests: results from the Infant Development, Environment, and Lifestyle study.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23275056     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: To assess for the increased risk of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in young children with prenatal methamphetamine exposure from the multicenter, longitudinal Infant Development, Environment, and Lifestyle (IDEAL) study.
METHODS: The IDEAL study enrolled 412 mother-infant pairs at 4 sites (Tulsa, OK; Des Moines, IA; Los Angeles, CA; and Honolulu, HI). Methamphetamine-exposed subjects (n = 204) were identified by self-report and/or gas chromatography/mass spectrometry confirmation of amphetamine and metabolites in infant meconium. Matched subjects (n = 208) denied methamphetamine use and had a negative meconium screen. This analysis included a subsample of 301 subjects who were administered the Conners' Kiddie Continuous Performance Test (K-CPT) at 5.5 years of age (153 exposed and 148 comparison). Hierarchical linear models adjusted for covariates tested exposure effects on K-CPT measures. Using the same covariates, logistic regression was used to determine the effect of exposure on the incidence of a positive ADHD confidence index score, defined as greater than 50%.
RESULTS: There were no differences between the groups in omission or commission errors or reaction time for correct trials. However, methamphetamine exposure was associated with subtle differences in other outcomes predictive of ADHD, including increased slope of reaction time across blocks (p < .001), increased variability in reaction time with longer interstimulus intervals (p < .01), and increased likelihood of greater than 50% on the ADHD confidence index (odds ratio, 3.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-7.8; p = .02).
CONCLUSION: Prenatal methamphetamine exposure was associated with subtle differences in K-CPT scores at 5.5 years of age. Even at this relatively young age, these children exhibit indicators of risk for ADHD and warrant monitoring.
Authors:
Zeina N Kiblawi; Lynne M Smith; Linda L LaGasse; Chris Derauf; Elana Newman; Rizwan Shah; Amelia Arria; Marilyn Huestis; Sheri DellaGrotta; Lynne M Dansereau; Charles Neal; Barry Lester
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of developmental and behavioral pediatrics : JDBP     Volume:  34     ISSN:  1536-7312     ISO Abbreviation:  J Dev Behav Pediatr     Publication Date:  2013 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-12-31     Completed Date:  2013-06-28     Revised Date:  2014-01-09    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8006933     Medline TA:  J Dev Behav Pediatr     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  31-7     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Amphetamine-Related Disorders / complications
Attention / drug effects*
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity / chemically induced
Case-Control Studies
Central Nervous System Stimulants / adverse effects*,  analysis
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Meconium / chemistry
Methamphetamine / adverse effects*,  analysis
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications / psychology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects / etiology,  psychology*
Psychological Tests
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
1R01DA014948/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; 1UL1-TR000124/TR/NCATS NIH HHS; 5P20 RR11091/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; UL1 TR000124/TR/NCATS NIH HHS; Z01 DA000433-08/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; Z01 DA000433-09/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; ZIA DA000433-10/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; ZIA DA000433-11/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; ZIA DA000433-12/DA/NIDA NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Central Nervous System Stimulants; 44RAL3456C/Methamphetamine
Comments/Corrections

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