Document Detail


Effect of alginate on satiation, appetite, gastric function, and selected gut satiety hormones in overweight and obesity.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  19960001     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Lack of control of food intake, excess size, and frequency of meals are critical to the development of obesity. The stomach signals satiation postprandially and may play an important role in control of calorie intake. Sodium alginate (based on brown seaweed Laminaria digitata) is currently marketed as a weight loss supplement, but its effects on gastric motor functions and satiation are unknown. We evaluated effects of 10 days treatment with alginate or placebo on gastric functions, satiation, appetite, and gut hormones associated with satiety in overweight or obese adults. We conducted a randomized, 1:1, placebo-controlled, allocation-concealed study in 48 overweight or obese participants with excluded psychiatric comorbidity and binge eating disorder. All underwent measurements of gastric emptying (GE), fasting, and postprandial gastric volumes (GVs), postprandial satiation, calorie intake at a free choice meal and selected gut hormones after 1 week of alginate (three capsules vs. matching placebo per day, ingested 30 min before the main meal). Six capsules were ingested with water 30 min before the GE, GV, and satiation tests on days 8-10. There were no treatment group effects on GE or volumes, gut hormones (ghrelin, cholecystokinin (CCK), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), peptide YY (PYY)), satiation, total and macronutrient calorie intake at a free choice meal. There was no difference detected in results between obese and overweight patients. Alginate treatment for a period of 10 days showed no effect on gastric motor functions, satiation, appetite, or gut hormones. These results question the use of short-term alginate treatment for weight loss.
Authors:
Suwebatu T Odunsi; María I Vázquez-Roque; Michael Camilleri; Athanasios Papathanasopoulos; Matthew M Clark; Lynne Wodrich; Mary Lempke; Sanna McKinzie; Michael Ryks; Duane Burton; Alan R Zinsmeister
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural     Date:  2009-12-03
Journal Detail:
Title:  Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.)     Volume:  18     ISSN:  1930-739X     ISO Abbreviation:  Obesity (Silver Spring)     Publication Date:  2010 Aug 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-07-28     Completed Date:  2011-02-10     Revised Date:  2013-05-31    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101264860     Medline TA:  Obesity (Silver Spring)     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1579-84     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Division of Biomedical Statistics and Bioinformatics, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Alginates / pharmacology*,  therapeutic use
Energy Intake / drug effects
Female
Gastric Emptying / drug effects
Glucuronic Acid / pharmacology,  therapeutic use
Hexuronic Acids / pharmacology,  therapeutic use
Hormones / metabolism
Humans
Laminaria / chemistry*
Male
Obesity / drug therapy*,  metabolism
Overweight / drug therapy*,  metabolism
Plant Extracts / pharmacology*,  therapeutic use
Postprandial Period
Satiation / drug effects
Single-Blind Method
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
K24 DK002638-10/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; K24 DK02638/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; R01 DK067071/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; R01 DK067071-05/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; R01 DK67071/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; RR0024150/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; UL1 RR024150-01/RR/NCRR NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Alginates; 0/Hexuronic Acids; 0/Hormones; 0/Plant Extracts; 576-37-4/Glucuronic Acid; 9005-32-7/alginic acid
Comments/Corrections
Comment In:
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2010 Nov;18(11):2069; author reply 2070   [PMID:  20978479 ]

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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