Document Detail


Eczema and early solid feeding in preterm infants.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  15033836     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
AIMS: To establish whether development of eczema is influenced by feeding practices in preterm infants, while taking account of confounding factors. METHODS: Data were assembled from 257 infants born prematurely and studied to 12 months post-term. Logistic regression analysis was performed to establish the association between feeding practices and eczema, allowing for potential confounding factors including the infants' gender, parental atopic status, social background, and parental smoking habits. RESULTS: For the development of eczema (with or without other symptoms) by 12 months post-term, the introduction of four or more solid foods by or before 17 weeks post-term was a significant risk (odds ratio 3.49). Male infants were at significantly higher risk (odds ratio 1.84). In addition, having non-atopic parents who introduced solid foods before 10 weeks post-term or having at least one atopic parent represented a significant risk scenario (odds ratio 2.94). CONCLUSIONS: Early introduction of a diverse range of solid foods may predispose the preterm infant to eczema development by 12 months post-term. Furthermore, non-atopic parents who practice early as opposed to late introduction of solid foods may be exposing preterm infants to a greater risk of eczema by 12 months post-term.
Authors:
J Morgan; P Williams; F Norris; C M Williams; M Larkin; S Hampton
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Archives of disease in childhood     Volume:  89     ISSN:  1468-2044     ISO Abbreviation:  Arch. Dis. Child.     Publication Date:  2004 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2004-03-22     Completed Date:  2004-05-06     Revised Date:  2009-11-18    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0372434     Medline TA:  Arch Dis Child     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  309-14     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
School of Biomedical and Life Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, UK. j.morgan@surrey.ac.uk
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Eczema / etiology*
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Infant Food*
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature*
Male
Maternal Age
Middle Aged
Parents
Paternal Age
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk Factors
Smoking / adverse effects
Weaning*
Comments/Corrections
Comment In:
Arch Dis Child. 2004 Apr;89(4):295   [PMID:  15033830 ]

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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